Posts Tagged ‘video games’

Day of the Devs

Monday, November 10th, 2014

Day of the Devs - Double Fine convention - in San Francisco, California

It was a video game enthusiast’s paradise. Screens and consoles decked every wall of (nearly) every room of the two story Old Mint building in San Francisco, all displaying demos of games to be released within the next year. There was a crowd gathered around each display, each person eager to get a chance at playing the game. I was attending with a few other friends from Cogswell, whose brains I could audibly hear exploding as they took in scenery and games around them.

The turnout of indie game developers was amazing. Day of the Devs was hosted by Double Fine, so they had a room full of their own soon-to-be-released games such as Costume Quest 2 and even a remastered version of Grim Fandango, but the rest of the building was filled with small studio games like Night In The Woods and Knight Squad (my personal favorites), Classroom Aquatic, Push Me Pull You, Spy Party, Ikarus, and Please Don’t, Spacedog. A few of the games were played with an Oculus Rift headset. There was even a swag shop full of t-shirts and books related to the games. Outside in the courtyard was a bar and a stage where live DJ’s played music, and games were actively played on a large screen by their developers.

It was enough to make any self-declared nerd hyperventilate. Being as there were a thousand in attendance, the excitement in the air was palpable. Within the first ten minutes, I was thrown a controller and fighting in an arena with five or six other well-seasoned game players. My first thought was along the line of panic, as I was sure I was going to get my butt kicked by people who definitely played more often than I did, but by the first game I was hooked and throwing other players to their deaths.

In the game Classroom Aquatic, one player wore Oculus Rift headgear and was plunged into an underwater school for dolphins. The character they played was a student diver who hadn’t studied for a test. As a result, the player is forced to cheat off of the neighboring students in the room. The trick was to avoid being caught by the teacher. The game effectively gave the player knots in their stomach, and was especially nerve-wracking when players were caught and scolded by the teacher.

Day of the Devs was amazing for one huge reason; EVERYONE there was in love with games, whether they were fans or developers. As a result, there was a feeling of common purpose and enthusiasm. We were all there for the same thing, and it was exciting to be in a place where people from inside the industry and out of it mixed together in a gaming paradise.

During the course of the evening, we got to talk to Double Fine creators, several other indie game makers, and even managed some networking with other people in the game industry! It was absolutely a beneficial experience, and it made the prospect of graduation and getting to work in the industry more tangible. I’m looking forward to next year with Day of the Devs!

9 Video Games We Wish Had Sequels

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

When video game studios hit on a good idea, they’ll frequently throw all of their resources into turning that one success into a string of successes. Although franchising is very common, every now and then a designer will leave a great title as a lone project. It might be a budget issue or politics among the developers or just bad luck, but whatever the reason, some favorite titles that would be well-suited to follow-ups have been left untouched for years. From underground research facilities in Half-Life to heroic journeys in Heavenly Sword; the end of these games has left thousands of gamers heartbroken.

Some are stand-alones and some are series that lost their way, but a new chapter of any of these stories would be welcomed with open arms. Visit this link for a full list of the nine video games that we wish would get sequels.

Article originally published at Mashable here.

10 Most Influential Games of the 80s

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

It’s no secret that video games were a great deal different back in the 1980’s; from classics we still see today to the games that didn’t live to see the next decade. Remember the original versions of SimCity (1989), The Legend of Zelda (1987), John Madden Football (1988), and Super Mario Bros. (1985)? What about the always classic Pac-Man (1980) and Tetris (1987)? One component we can all likely agree on, however, is the fact that the ghosts of gaming past have paved the way and made a huge impact on the gaming industry we see today. This Yahoo article gives their picks of the 10 most influential games of the 1980s, but we’ll let you be the judge on which games were the most impactful from that decade.

What would you add to their list? How would you rank the games? Give us your two cents below!

How One Man Built a Video Game to Pop the Question

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

What happens when guy video gamer meets girl video gamer and they fall in love? The guy, Robert Fink, makes a video game to ask his beloved, Angel White, to marry him. In this article in Yahoo Shine, he said that the task took about 5 months to complete and he discovered that the hardest part was keeping the project a secret.

In the game, dubbed “Knight Man,” a dashing white knight attempts to save a princess by completing a series of challenges. Each successful challenge helps him build a golden ring that, in turn, unlocks the castle, where the princess is frozen in a crystal.

Try out the game here and let us know what you think.

Where Did ET Go?

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Following the popular Steven Spielberg movie, “ET,” Atari made a video game about the adventures of the lost, little alien. According to this report in Marketplace.org, it was among the worst video games ever and Atari purportedly buried its mistake in the New Mexico dessert.

Now a Canadian video game company, Fuel Entertainment, is attempting to locate it and dig it up. Watch this short video of the Marketplace report and a short gameplay video of the original Atari game.

Do you agree that the ET video game is one of the worst ever made?

The Art of Incredipede

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

In this talk from GDC 2013, Colin Northway and Thomas Shahan share how they developed the art for Incredipede. Colin handled the game design side of the game while Thomas focused on the art. The duo walks you through the process they went through to develop the image for their game.

The concept started with a simple drawing, then gravitated toward a 17th century-influenced, mythic artwork style and finally found the look they felt best represented the gameplay. At Cogswell College we have classes devoted to developing the artistic concept that best suits your project.

Incredipede is a puzzle game that celebrates the vast diversity of life in the world. The game follows Quozzle, a lone Incredipede on a dire quest to rescue her sisters. She has a unique ability to grow new arms and legs wherever she needs them, transforming into a snake, a spider, a horse, a monkey – anything you can imagine.

Have you ever struggled coming up with the right concept art for a project?