Posts Tagged ‘Sony Computer Entertainment of America’

E3 Recap 2 – Final Fantasy 7

Friday, June 26th, 2015

Source: Official Trailer - YouTube

In 1994 a game that has been since known as a ground breaker for Japanese RPGs began development. It was originally intended to be developed and released for the Super Nintendo, and was moved to to N64. The only problem was even the largest N64 cartridge lacked the capacity required for the game, the first in this game series to use fully rendered 3D characters on a pre-rendered background.

Final Fantasy 7 was released on the Sony Playstation in 1997 to critical and commercial success, through the years and various re-releases and versions, its sold over 10 million copies worldwide. At the 2005 E3 conference a PS3 Technical Demo of FFVII was shown off leading many to believe a remake was on the way. After a decade of speculation and rumors, a Final Fantasy 7 remake was officially announced at this years E3 in the form of a trailer.

Source: FFVII Official Trailer - YouTube

With visuals that are at times brilliant and vibrant, and then shadowy and brooding, Square Enix manage to transport us to right back into that world we first explored some 18 years ago. A haunting score reminiscent of the horror classics of yesterday plays over a narration delivered by voice actor David Lodge, all the while we are treated to sights both old and new. Director Tetsuya Nomura reassures us that this game isn’t just the original with a face lift, but rather something like visiting an old friend who has new clothes. Not everything is exactly the same, nor will it be, but classic and pivotal story elements won’t be altered in any way. Speaking with Famitsu, Mr. Nomura had the following to say about the trailer and game:

“We’re using part of that video in the game. We’re going to raise the quality even more.”, he said on using footage from the trailer in-game. On platform choice he said, “You’ll be able to play it first on PlayStation 4, that’s for certain. We’re not thinking beyond that yet, so after that is undecided. Since we’re bringing out PlayStation 4 title after PlayStation 4 title, it’d be great if we can give the hardware and industry a boost.”.

On whether or not the game was just a remaster or a remake Nomura said, “Final Fantasy VII is special, and we can’t ‘exceed’ the game by simply making the graphics nicer. That’s not a thing to be excited about…. Precisely because it’s a full remake, I want to challenge what’s fun and what’s possible now.”. When asked about the possibility of new characters, Nomura said, “There won’t be new characters. As for the visual taste, we’re doing them to match today’s visuals and appear closer to reality.”. Lastly, when asked about the game and battle system he said, “I can’t share details, but we’re changing it to a more realistic system.”.

In an interview with Matt Kamen from Wired UK Tetsuya Nomura had the following to say:

“In terms of taking a such an iconic game and giving it a fresh feel, we can’t go into too much detail but we’re not intending for this to become a one-to-one remake, or just the original Final Fantasy VII with better graphics,” Nomura says.

“We don’t want to interfere with what makes the original title so iconic,” Nomura explains. “There are certain plot points we don’t want to interfere with or disturb, nor will we want to change elements that fans have very big attachments to.”

Source: FFVII Official Trailer - YouTube

“My goal with the remake is to make it apply to the current era, the current generation of players that are going to be coming into contact with or playing FFVII for the first time through this remake,” Nomura continues. “I want to make it so it’s relevant to the modern era, as well as having an element of surprise.”

“It has to be something that riles up this sense of wonder and amazement. I don’t want to change it so much that it’s unrecognisable, but make sure that it’s something fresh and new [yet still] recognisable as FFVII. That’s what I’ll be keeping in mind as I work on this.”

“We’re taking something that’s text based with no voice over. If we add voice over to it, that will trigger some adjustments that need to be made to accomodate for that. Then, because we’re making it in full HD, we’ll need to think about all the resources that are needed to populate the screen. We’d need to go in and see what needs adjusting in that aspect. It’s like a chain of events; ‘OK, we’re going to revamp this part, what do we need?’, and see if there are any changes that creates. As I say, we can’t go into the specifics at this point but we’ll need to revisit elements within the game to see what is appropriate.”

“This term, ‘J-RPG’, I don’t approve of it,” he says. “I don’t get why it’s being referred to as such — it almost feels like people are kind of making fun of RPGs that are coming out of Japan. I think ‘well, how are they different to RPGs coming from other countries, what’s the difference?’ It feels very uncomfortable when people bring up the term JRPG.”

No official release date has been confirmed or announced, all we currently know is the game is slated to come out on the PS4 first. If there’s any concern over the changes being made to the game, bear in mind original writer Kazushige Nojima is on the project to contribute any new story content, and the original game’s director Yoshinori Kitase is a producer.

Source: FFVII Official Trailer - YouTube

Watch the announcement trailer here.

Written by Juan Rubio, with some edited excerpts credited in the article.
Cogswell College Blog

An Interview with Nathan Brenholdt on Being a Sound Engineer for SCEA

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

Nathan Brenholdt (Cogswell College class of 1996) holds a BS in Music Engineering Technology and is a Sr. Sound Designer, Sony Computer Entertainment America

1.    Company name, your job title, a brief description of your job responsibilities and how long you have worked there.

I am a Senior Sound Designer at Sony Computer Entertainment America.  I have been here for 16 years.

2.    Can you give an example of what you might do on a ‘typical’ day?

A typical day is spent planning, recording, creating, editing, implementing, and reviewing sounds for our games.

3.    Can you give an example of something that surprised you about your job when you first started?

It was many years ago, but I was most surprised that my initial title was “Multimedia Specialist”, and that I received at home a generic form letter from HR saying they received my resume, and would get back to me if any positions became available – almost 2 years after I had started working at Sony!

4.    Describe your piece of the production cycle. How does what you do move the project forward?

I generally start early in the production cycle, talking with the creative director and producers about roughly what they are looking for from sound.  Often times, they really don’t know, and can only answer some basic questions about the overall game design.  Usually the type of game and overall look of the game suggest the direction of sound.  From there, I will meet with the audio programmer to design the audio engine and naming conventions.  Our design tools often don’t cover every aspect of sound, so we need additional support for things like debug displays, additional interactive audio parameter tweakers, implementation tools, and formulas for how sound travels through the environment.  Then it’s time to put together some of the main sounds, and get feedback on the overall audio design.  And the rest of the game is usually an iteration process: creating, implementing, reviewing, and tweaking the sounds, dialog, and music.  A fast iteration time is important because of the large number of changes that are made during the development cycle.

5.    How big is the team you are part of for a typical project? What kind of interaction do you have with other team members?

The basic in-game sound effects team is often still fairly small, sometimes as few as 2 or 3 people.  But those numbers can grow quickly if the game is large, or a lot of original content is required.  And once you add dialog, music, and post-production, a lot more people become involved.  A lot of additional work will get contracted out if the people aren’t required for the full project:  Foley, dialog, post-production, music sessions, editing, testing…  The numbers might jump into the hundreds, once you credit everyone involved with the audio in some way.

6.    What projects have you worked on in the past?

I have been most involved with the franchises: Twisted Metal, Syphon Filter, SOCOM: US Navy SEALs, God of War, and Uncharted.  I did a lot of work for the SOCOM games, and really enjoyed going out with the Navy many times over the years, recording their vehicles and weapons.  But with each new game and each new hardware platform come a new set of challenges, which is fun.  Also, games aren’t like movies.  The games are extremely dynamic and you have to plan for so many possibilities with a limited set of sounds and memory.

7.    What do you find most rewarding about your job?

Being able to do something that I enjoy that stays fun, challenging, and new.

8.    What advice would you give students preparing for a career like yours?

I would learn as much as you can, especially on the math, science, and engineering side.  Combine different fields.  You’ll open a lot of doors if your artistic side comes together with computer programming, scripting, engineering, business, or production.  Create your own projects.  Get involved with groups.  Apply for internships.  Measure your work against professionals or direct competition.

9.    QUOTE about how Cogswell helped prepare you for this career?

Cogswell was a great place to combine my passions for sound, music, computers and electronics.

10.  What qualities does someone need to have to be successful in this field?

The engineering, math, scripting, and project management side can be just as important as the creative side.  It’s important to be able to communicate well and adapt to changes.  And of course be able to create high-quality sounds for games!