Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

Pixar Resume Presentation

Monday, May 4th, 2015

Source: Pixar Times

On April the 29th, I attended a presentation at Pixar by two leading HR recruiters in the industry who specified the do’s and don’ts of the application process. The presentation was highly informative and answered many burning questions that any applicants might have for companies looking to hire. I took notes on what the recruiters said they were looking for, and would like to share them with other Cogswell students.

Resumes
• Include all of work experience with dates, keep updated. Don’t worry so much about formatting.
• Put work experience before schooling.
• Make contact info easy to find.
• List software skills. (Maya, Zbrush, etc) Make sure of proficiency. Some people put level of experience next to the software.
• Clubs, interests, awards are good to list.
• Font doesn’t matter, readability does.
• Prior work experience that isn’t industry experience is acceptable.
• References aren’t necessary, they come later in the hiring process.
• If you took time off to travel, include in resume.
• High school details don’t really matter.
• Objectives, if included, should be focused. It’s ok not to have it.
• Personal logos don’t matter so much.
• If you have experience/education in one thing but really have interest in another, present that.
Cover Letter
• In production, the cover letter is everything. It’s all recruiters have to know your personality.
• Summarize who you are, what you do, and why you want to do the job. Don’t go on about your life story, but clearly explain why you would be the best candidate.
• It is very good to have a cover letter, and you should always have one available. Sometimes, hiring managers do skip reading the cover letter and go straight to the resume.
• Don’t be a fanboy.
• Don’t be arrogant. The cover letter is about your story and you—tell it like one.
• Humility and being humble will take you far.
Demo Reels
• Should be around 2 minutes. Quality is better than quantity. Most recent work in the front if possible, things that you’re really proud of.
• Do call-outs in your demo reel, clarifying what you did if you’re presenting group work. Be honest about what you’ve done, specify your job.
• Sound isn’t necessary, unless it’s lip-syncing.
• ONLY include best stuff. Don’t put in filler material.
• If submitting on a website, having demo reels separated into different subjects/different areas might be good.
• They can see all the positions you’ve applied to. Don’t go applying for every job available at the studio. Be certain about what you want.
• It’s ok if the demo reel is super short, only include best work.
• Social media can influence a decision.
Interview
• Be well-presented. Dress well, care about hygiene and personal appearance.
• Come prepared. Make sure links, material is all set and ready to go.
• Do research on the company. Know about the films and their work.
• Come early, rather than late.
• Show interest, speak about what you’re applying for. Know about your position.
• Ask genuine questions, ones you can’t find on the website.
• Be humble!!
• Make eye contact with everyone.
• Write a thank-you email to the recruiters. It’s okay to follow up.
• Check-in emails are good. If you got really close in the interview process, every 3-6 months you can stay in contact with recruiters.

Sierra Gaston

Lucasfilm Recruiters Visit Cogswell

Monday, October 19th, 2009

Last Monday night Cogswell hosted a visit by Lucasfilm Recruiters. They showed some of the pioneering work the done by the various divisions of Lucasfilm, and even showed some work in production. They spoke about some of the changes in the industry and how graduating students can prepare for a career- in particular, the Jedi Academy Internship.

One of the most interesting points was that there are a few rare entry level positions with these companies. They are looking for strong Riggers at the moment, and they are always looking for entry level Technical Directors. The Recruiter from Lucasfilm Animation stressed that your chances of landing an entry level job increase exponentially if you are an animator but you have some programming and scripting under your belt.

This visit highlights the importance of always keeping a reel in progress. If you were prepared on Monday night, there was a good chance you could have picked up a rigging gig at LucasArts! Just another example of why it is better to prepare than to plan. Many times students hear about openings and start to prepare a reel, but by the time they are ready the opportunity has long passed. Be diligent and always have your best work ready to show to recruiters.

I want to mention that we are running Rigging 1 right now, and we will offer Rigging 2 next semester. You probably already know that we updated our Scripting for CG class that we are running now, and if there is interest, we can run again next term. One other course to note is the new Game Level Design 2 on the schedule next semester. The Spring 2010 class schedule will be released next week.

Keep your eyes open for the next industry visit, and keep that reel up to date!

-Michael Martin, Dean of the College