Posts Tagged ‘electronic music’

Professor Julius Dobos, Award-Winning Electronic Music and Film Score Composer, Releases ‘Forgotten Future: W1′

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

New Electronic Music Album is First in 4-Installment Concept Series from Acclaimed Composer

Sunnyvale, CA, July 21, 2015 – Julius Dobos, an award-winning, platinum-album composer mostly known for his film-scores and electronic musical works, has released the first piece of a unique psybient electronic music project, under the moniker forgotten future. Entitled forgotten future: W1, the new album is the first installment of a 4-piece concept series, the framework of a musical and ideological endeavor, which aims to take the listener through Universal themes centered around four “big questions”: human existence, time, space, and purpose. Far form being dogmatic, forgotten future: W1 offers an environment of alternative realism for the listener to explore their “future memories” in, and find their personal answers.

The original concept work borrows elements both from current science and ancient belief systems, but also deeply crosses into metaphysics. Comprised of complex rhythmic patterns, haunting melodies, monumental electronic instrumentation, dynamic structures, cutting edge sound design and organic textures of electronic soundscapes, the music evokes strong emotions and memories, sending its listeners on a 15-track psybient journey through time, space and new dimensions. To preview select clips from the new album, please visit

Dobos also spends time as a Distinguished Lecturer in Residence within the Digital Audio Technology program at Silicon Valley’s Cogswell College. “Julius Dobos’ ‘Forgotten Future’ is a terrific album containing truly beautiful music. We are very fortunate to have such a creative artist of this caliber in our midst,” said Timothy W. Duncan, Professor and Director of the college’s Digital Audio Technology program.

Said Dobos, “Forgotten Future: W1 is the story of a journey – one of multiversal scale, beyond the boundaries of time and through seven dimensions. It is about the journey we will all take one day. We are frightened of the unknown, yet it feels so familiar… it feels like we have been in this environment before. This trip is a curious and humbling experience, a galactic travel on a forgotten road that takes us to a mysterious destination, which road seems like… we must have traveled it before. Upon returning from our voyage, we only bring the distant memories of feelings with us… forgetting the experience – which we will re-live again, in the future.”

Forgotten future: W1 took Dobos five years to conceptualize, compose music and design sounds for – every bit of audio heard on the album is built from the ground up. Vincent Villuis of the genre-leading Ultimae label and dark-ambient pioneer Robert Rich also contributed to the production in the mastering phase. According to Dobos, an important goal was to create a long-term listening experience with music that features dozens of (almost) hidden layers – each with a meaning or emotion attached to it. “If even after the seventeenth listen you are still discovering new elements, cool little details that might change your interpretation of the concept, I will feel I was successful” – said the composer.


The Hungarian-born Dobos started his piano studies at age five and was composing music at nine. After combining his studies in music production, audio engineering and composition, he scored art films, feature movies, designed soundscapes for installations, released seven albums and worked on projects such as the DragonBall Z soundtracks, produced music for use in national television shows and movies such as Don’t Mess with the Zohan, Mallcop and Zookeeper.

Between his work as forgotten future and composing music for use in film, Dobos also shares his production experience with the audio professionals of the future. As a Distinguished Lecturer in residence at Cogswell Polytechnical College of Silicon Valley, an educational institution offering a unique curriculum fusing Digital Art, Engineering and Entrepreneurship, he teaches music production and sound design courses. He also leads an original audio- and music production program, MediaWorks, in which students have worked with such real-life clients as Panasonic or TEDx. In 2012, Dobos moved his cutting-edge electronic music production center, Studio CS, to Cogswell’s campus, providing students access to his collection of unique sound synthesis tools and expertise.


The new album is now available via all major outlets both as a digital download, a 24-bit studio master, and as a premium digipak edition CD complete with a 20-page booklet featuring the original work of three European digital painters.

Available via:

Composed and Performed by: Forgotten Future
Produced by: Julius Dobos
Label: Creative Shop Music
Publishing: Creative Shop Publishing and Spirit Music Group

Official websites: and


“Designed as a “fiercely collaborative, living laboratory,” Cogswell College is located in the heart of the legendary Silicon Valley in Sunnyvale, California. The school is a WASC accredited, four-year institution of higher education with a specialized curriculum that fuses digital arts, audio technology, game design, engineering and entrepreneurship. For more information, please call 1-800-264-7955 or visit:

As seen on:
Mix Online
Music Industry News Network
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Trailer Music Vibe
Creative Planet Network

Get Your BEAT On in the Electronic Music Competition

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

Cogswell Digital Audio Technology student, Daniel McFarren, has put together a unique final portfolio project – a competition designed to spotlight the very best electronic musicians in the Bay Area. The final field will consist of five artists who will complete challenges to inspire creativity and innovation.

From on-the-spot creation of interesting loops to full-on song production, to live performance in front of a club audience, artists will have the chance to prove themselves as worthy beatmakers. A panel of leading industry judges will put the artists to the test, critique their work and scrutinize their style. The ultimate champion will have the chance to headline at a Bay Area club event.

When asked, why this particular project instead of something else, McFarren replied,

“There is this vast population of talented musician/DJs, just waiting for their chance to get up on stage and show everyone in that club the cool stuff they figured out through many sleepless nights in front of a laptop, hunched over a MIDI controller. The creativity of these artists came from the disparity between their musical inspiration and the lack of of technological resources available to them. It is, in fact, the non-optimal conditions of music composition that drive the creativity that fuels the evolution of Electronic Music. This, I believe, is why we are seeing such a flourish of unique EM music from ‘bedroom producers,’ who scrimp and save the meager income from their day job to get he very basic tools needed to make the music that drives them. With the help of my good friend and Co-Creator for the show, John Buell, we have made an attempt at translating this evolutionary drive into the form of a competition, where those artists who have that creative spark get the chance to be noticed, and possibly jump up on stage next to that headliner that helped inspire them in the first place.”

Submissions must be in by March 3 and interviews will be held during the week of March 9 at Motiv Nightclub in Santa Cruz to select the five competitors.

For additional information and submission details, visit BEAT.

Growing Appetite for Electronic Music

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Students in Cogswell College's Ultimate Electronic Music Production class.

Since Cogswell College has a powerful electronic music program, we found this recap of the Krake Festival in Germany which includes a number of audio clips from Killekill’s Bill Youngman, Tim Exile and Samuel Kerridge.

In case you missed it, here is the promo video for the Ultimate Electronic Music Production class.


Electronic Music Thrives at Cogswell College

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Late last spring we shared information about some of the unique classes available to Cogswell students over the Summer and “Ultimate Electronic Music Production” was one of them.

Now that it is winding down for this term, we would like give you a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the class, which was a combination of research, practical learning and great fun. This VIDEO demonstrates the amazing opportunity electronic musicians have when they study at Cogswell.

“The main focus of the class is to teach the ideology and culture behind electronic music, and not focus on any particular style. I wanted to create an overview of compositional and musical sound design approaches and processes, go beyond just sharing tips and tricks, and let students develop their own, original methods that they can apply to any electronic music project. Another major consideration was to give students some experience with using the tools of a working electronic music studio via various hands-on assignments,” said Julius Dobos, Distinguished Lecturer at Cogswell.

The class did spend time listening to Musique Concrete works, Jarre and Kraftwerk albums, followed by one of their assignments where students had to create a Kraftwerk sound-alike piece – not recreate a particular song, but apply the unique style to a brand new composition. Kraftwerk was a German quartet that laid the groundwork for most electronic- and synth-based artists that followed them in the 1970’s and 1980’s and even today. Students started with a blank canvas, designed their own sounds and used them to composed the music as a group.

The primary takeaway Dobos hopes students receive from this course is “the discovery of an unexpected diversity in this segment of musical art which we call Electronic Music. It’s not a style, but an ever-evolving combination of compositional, musical sound design and intellectual elements. Understanding and recreating the approaches from historic to modern, learning about the evolution of music technology and the pioneers of electronic music, including those lesser known in the United States, would greatly expand the creative horizon of any composer – not to mention Cogswell’s talented students with a particular interest in electronic music.”

“I took the class to widen my skill set and palette,” said student, Robert Kirby. “The class looked like a great way to expand my understanding of the genre. The advantage of electronic music is the wide range of sounds at your fingertips. Using the synthesizers I achieved some pretty cool things. I was happy with the class after the first assignment.”

Besides teaching at Cogswell, Mr. Dobos is the Founding Composer of The Creative Shop, a music production studio with a clientele that has included Sony Entertainment, The Discovery Channel, Nokia and other high-profile clients. Having been composing since age 9, Mr. Dobos has released seven musical albums in various electronic music styles, among them the platinum-selling Connecting Images. His music has been featured in major motion pictures including You Don’t Mess with the Zohan, Paul Blart: Mall Cop, Zookeeper, as well as a variety of television programs, advertising campaigns, exhibitions and sound installations in the United States and Europe. In 2012, Dobos was invited to move his vast Studio CS to Cogswell to give students access to a level of equipment that many professionals only dream about. Some of the synthesizers are truly unique pieces, such as the rare Crumar Spirit (one of the 260 units ever built), the Ensoniq Fizmo, and the coveted Yamaha CS-60. (Check out the Studio CS equipment list.)

“It’s actually not the gear, but the concept that really matters. Technology can be impressive and even overwhelming, but there is no substitute for meaning & feel when it comes to textures and sounds.
More than being the core part of my career, electronic music has been my passion for as long as I can remember – I have been living and working in the world of sounds and music for close to three decades. Sharing this world and my passion within the structure of a special topic course with a select group of students who have expressed a deep interest in electronic music, seemed like a unique opportunity for them and was a great new experience for me as well.”

“Julius knows everything there is to know about electronic music so working with him was a chance to work with a master, plus the chance to experiment on all this amazing equipment,” said student, Daniel McFarren.