Posts Tagged ‘Disney’

Recent News in Animation and More

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

source: (cc) flickr user fleecircus

When reading about famous animators I’ve come to realize there is a very clear trend, there seems to be more coverage of male talent vs female. Is it that I’m not looking in the right places? Or perhaps there is actually more male than female artists in general, I’m not exactly sure to be quite honest. Luckily, Canadian artist Heather Kai Smith has taken it upon herself to create a website/database called Great Women Animators.

Great Women Animators says its a “collection, dissemination and categorization of identified women who have or currently work in the field of animation.” The website features biographies, filmographies, and images from female artists from the early 1910′s up until present day, illustrators, and contributors. Not limiting itself to western film, Great Women Animators also features artists from Japan, the former Soviet Union, and other international animation regions.

The project began as a month long series of film screenings hosted by Kai Smith in the summer of 2014. At the event, the attendees analyzed and explored “techniques and thematic influences of these women animators” and took part in “discussions regarding feminism in the field of animation, masculine and feminine aesthetics, and what it means to be a woman working with animation today.”

Great Women Animators is very much a living, breathing creation, which is to say its a work in progress that’s constantly evolving. The about page reads, “This is an ONGOING project and this list is by no means comprehensive. New animators are added all the time.”. The website also features a resource list, where visitors can look at and explore related websites, events and academic journals.

The site not only sheds light on women animators, but its also a reminder of all the work that goes on behind the scenes of our favorite cartoons and and movies. Please check out the website and show your support!

source: schmoesknow.com

In other news, Pixar’s new movie “Inside Out” has been confirmed to premier at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival! Director Pete Doctor, who was behind “Up” (the first animated feature ever to be the festival’s Opening Ceremony film), producer Jonas Rivera (Up), and co-director Ronnie Del Carmen (Up) will be in attendance at Cannes, along with members of the all-star English-language voice cast.

“We are overjoyed at being included in this year’s official selection at Cannes,” said Docter. “With Inside Out, we spent years imagining — and then building — never-before-seen settings and characters within the mind. It was an incredible, fun and exciting challenge and now we can’t wait to share it with the world.”

“Inside Out” follows the story of a young girl named Riley, who moves away from her life in the Midwest when her father starts a new job in San Francisco. Riley is guided by her emotions: Joy (Amy Poehler), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith). The emotions live in Headquarters, the central hub inside Riley’s mind, where they help get her through her struggles in adjusting to a new city and school.

Disney/Pixar is going to ‘Inside Out’ in 3D in theaters everywhere starting June 19, 2015. The 68th annual Cannes Film Festival will kick off on May 13th, and you can view a trailer for the film on YouTube.

Source: Cartoon Brew

Also premiering at Cannes is filmmaker Mark Osborne’s ‘Le Petit Prince’ (The Little Prince), known for being the director of Dreamwork’s ‘Kung Fu Panda’, Osborne’s take on the french children’s story is fresh and vibrant. It will be released October 7, 2015 in France by Paramount Pictures, a US date has not been announced but Paramount Vantage has US screening rights already. The film is a new interpretation of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s classic 1943 novel ‘The Little Prince’, presented through the eyes of a young girl who discovers the book thru en elderly reclusive neighbor.

The film features two distinct styles, a familiar and contemporary CG world while we follow the girl’s story, and a beautifully rendered paper world when following The Little Prince. In this vibrant world everything is made of different sorts of paper and animated with the meticulous process of stop motion. We see everything from scraps of torn construction paper, to elaborate sets carefully made out of tissue paper, the world of ‘The Little Prince’ offers a refreshing break from the otherwise standard style of most CG animated films today. The book is the most-translated-French story of all time, selling over 150 million copies worldwide. The new movie was developed primarily by Mikros Image in Montreal, Canada, where Osborne is currently residing.

Watch a trailer for the movie on YouTube.

Juan Rubio

Lucasfilm and Disney’s Strange Magic

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Image from Blackfilm.com at: http://i.ytimg.com/vi/3wv7Li2V7S8/maxresdefault.jpg

When I heard that a recently-released animated movie had just set the record for all-time worst-opening ever for an animated film in 3000+ theaters, as well as the 7th-worst opening for any film playing in 3000+ theaters, I decided I needed to see for myself why the film was being avoided like the plague. So, I went ahead and purchased a matinee ticket to see Strange Magic, a 3D animated adventure that had been included in the Lucasfilm deal to Disney. So, Disney released it in a notoriously bad month to release movies: January.

To be honest, the trailer was awful. Not only had it been released at the last possible second, it looked like someone had thrown together clips from the film in a way that made no logical sense to the actual plot. Most people who watched the trailer decided that the movie was full of terrible, clichéd jokes and felt completely disorganized. However, there have been plenty of movies with bad trailers that turned out to be decent films, which is why I wanted to give Strange Magic a chance.

The verdict: it was strange. I was cringing in embarrassment and impatience for probably the first 10 minutes of the movie while all of the characters sang seemingly endless love and heartbreak songs. Don’t get me wrong, I love musicals, but the movie went about it the wrong way. The songs were steering the plot, while it should have happened the other way around.

Once the song marathon ended and we entered the Bog King’s domain, the movie picked up a little bit and I found myself enjoying some parts. There was some good character development for Marianne, the main character, in the first part of the story. While she started off as a starry-gazed, lovesick princess, something happens and she changes into a sword-fighting, awesome, disillusioned warrior chick that is grossed out by the mushier things of life, which had me cheering. After some good scenes in Act II, however, the movie reverted to being cringe-worthy and mushy.

Overall, the message of the story was good (everyone deserves to be loved, no matter what they look like), but the kaleidoscope-like scene at the end threw me off and was really too weird to get over. So—it was strange, yet slightly magical in some places, but understandable why the movie had such a bad opening weekend. Despite this, the animation was really impressive, and I was impressed with the color design in many of the environments (not quite as green as Epic). Although the plot wasn’t up to par, visually the movie was more fun. High-five to all the artists involved in this one!

(And still a better love story than Twilight)

Sierra Gaston

Disney Turns to Digital Technology to Fuse Animated 1959 with Live-Action 2014 Maleficent

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

On May 30th Disney fans will get a first look at the live-action retelling of the classic Sleeping Beauty from the point-of-view of the story’s renowned villain Maleficent, played by Angelina Jolie. Producers were posed with the challenge of sticking true to Walt Disney’s original 1959 animated version of the villainess, while introducing her in live-action to a 2014 audience that demands high-tech illusionary entertainment.

Digital art and animation teams worked to produce cartoon-like aspects while keeping the “real-life” feel. In the trailer we see Maleficent engulfed in what has been deemed by bloggers as “cartoony” green flames, harking back to the original animated signature evil powers. We also see computer-generated pixies, tree creatures, ravens and the infamous fire-breathing dragon, all adding to the live-but-animated feel.

Sound design took a different spin to create a more modern and gothic feel for the remake. The famous Disney classic “Once Upon a Dream” was recomposed as a haunting rendition by singer Lana Del Rey. The trailer also reveals the use of strategic sound bytes, mystical swoops, swishes and swacks all fashioned by digital audio designers. Dark crows and caw sounds add to the gothic haunt factor, all the while harking back to Maleficent’s original 1959 pet raven Diablo, recast as a shape shifter named Diaval in the live-action remake.

Will you be seeing this early summer blockbuster? Do you think the digital art and animation effects will be enough to allude to the original? Does Lana Del Rey’s rendition give you the creeps? Let us know in the comments!

Images Credit: Disneywikia.com

Links:

http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/File:Stand_Back_you_fools_-_Maleficent_-_kmp.PNG

http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Maleficent?file=Maleficent-%25282014%2529-54.jpg