Posts Tagged ‘designing sound’

Effective Workflow Tactics for Remote Clients and Collaborators

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Working on a remote team to complete a project is now the norm rather than the exception. In this article in Designing Sound contributed by Michael Schiciano of Skitch Studio, he shares his insights into working collaboratively and how to avoid some of the logistical challenges that can crop up.

Points covered in the article include:

  • Establishing the Vision and Scope of the Project; Whenever I had issues coming up with ideas in the middle of a project, a very likely culprit was simply not doing enough communication early enough in the project.
  • Detours and Changes; Sometimes these are messaged down from a client.  Other times they are discovered as part of the work itself.
  • Getting the Names Right; Another area you’ll want to make sure gets addressed during the middle of a production are the simpler, smaller details of effective naming conventions.
  • Making the Delivery; The final stages of a project will bring forth another wave of heavy communication, most notably focusing on the details of the submission process.

If you have collaborated on a project remotely, what did you learn in the process?

Considerations for Creative Audio Field Recording

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Richard Gould

Complete with field recording examples, in this article in Designing Sound, Sound Designer, Richard Gould, discusses the five creative considerations he employs when approaching field recording sessions. He says examining these considerations in light of work in progress, “have helped me consider the vast possibilities when I’m creating and capturing sounds.”

The five considerations he discusses are:

  1. Additive/Subtractive
  2. Shifting Perspective
  3. Context
  4. Technique
  5. Elemental

Gould also talks about the four developmental stages his inner-ear went to become a better field recorder:

  1. Listening for interesting sounds in relation to context
  2. Listening for interesting aspects of a sound, regardless of context
  3. Listening whilst considering the possibilities and later altering sounds to make them interesting
  4. Conceptualizing interesting sounds in my head and creating the conditions to replicate that sound

He explains his creative philosophy as follows, “I find that the more I approach field recording as an art form, with elements of improvisation and performance, the more rewarding the process becomes.”

Which of these considerations do you think will be helpful in your sound design work?

About Richard Gould

Hailing from England, Richard Gould studied sound and music in the United States at Berklee College of Music, focusing on audio for film and games. He has worked on numerous indie game and film titles in a number of capacities and loves to explore the ways in which music and sound can tell stories. Richard Co-Founded the Berklee Sound Design Network and Hexany Audio, an audio post-production company.

Writer and Director Pierce O’Toole Talks About Music and Inspiration

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

According to Pierce O’Toole, writer/director/producer of the web series “The Idle Quest,” music is an integral part of story development for him. In the beginning he uses it to get his creative juices flowing but once the story emerges, then the music he plays needs to match the mood of the script.

In this interview in Designing Sound, Pierce shares how he uses music to convey what he wants the film to achieve. Once production starts, music as becomes a reference point to help actors understand the scope of the performance he is looking for. He believes that capturing the right sound is as important as capturing the right visual.

At the end of the piece Pierce says, “Simply put, sound design is about transporting someone into the world of your story, letting it envelop them, and making them feel something.”

What take-away did you get from the article?

Using Sound to Draw Your Audience into Your Project

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

If a film were shot from the same camera angle for the entire movie, would the film have the same impact on its audience as one shot from different angles? According to this article in Designing Sound by Jack Menhorn, how an audience hears sounds can either bring them into the action or keep them on the fringes.

The piece explores techniques that create or reinforce a physical sense of space for the listener through the use of spatialized sound. Did you know that a human can ‘calibrate’ the approximate size of a room subconsciously within a few seconds of enter the space? This in-depth article talks about direct vs. reflected sounds, distance vs. ambient miking, proxemic zones and digital signal processing effects and the mix.

What is your biggest take-away from the article?