Top 10 Games we’d Love to Play in Virtual Reality

April 15th, 2014

The next chapter of gaming and entertainment is almost here; virtual reality. As Sony prepares ‘Project Morpheus’, a virtual reality prototype for the PS4; the realism that virtual reality games will be taken from concept to completion is approaching quickly. This new technology will deliver a sense of presence, where you as the player actually feel like you’re inside the game and your emotions feel that much more real.

With the knowledge that this will soon be available to the masses, CraveOnline made a list of the Top 10 Games We’d Love to Play in Virtual Reality. Although we think that practically any game in existence would be insanely cool to experience through virtual reality; this list really gets the imagination going at the idea of experiencing these games in a seemingly real environment. Take a look at their list and see for yourself!

What games would you love to experience through virtual reality? Comment below!

‘Old’ Movies Whose Special Effects Still Hold up Today

April 10th, 2014

Some of the movies we grew up on are great for so many reasons; and a big part of that was the special effects that went into them. Remember how real the dinosaurs in ‘Jurassic Park’ looked? Or how jaw dropping it was when the White House was obliterated in ‘Independence Day’? While we may laugh at some of the effects in past movies compared to the insanely real visuals in today’s movies; some can still be classified as ‘Awesome’! Visit this article for a list of 8 ‘Old’ Movies Whose Special Effects Still Hold up Today, as well as the most notable parts in the movie (complete with video)!

Which major flicks did they leave off the list?

iPhone Apps for Professional Audio Engineers

April 8th, 2014

From games to networking to organization tools, the number of apps available for the iPhone are almost endless and grow exponentially every year. The majority of apps have been fitted for enthusiasts, however, recently there’s been a rise in iPhone apps for professional audio engineers. These apps vary in price, from the free with advertising, to the eye-opening expensive. These apps make the everyday jobs of recording, editing, and exporting easier for audio engineers.

The three most abundant types of Pro-Audio iPhone apps are field recorders, portable digital audio workstations and remote controls.

Field Recorders

Many audio recorders apps lack the features found in traditional field recorders. However some have recently become available on the market that allow the engineer to conveniently capture a professional quality recording without having to purchase a separate device. Here are just a few:

  • Hindenburg Field Recorder
  • RODE Rec
  • iSLR Field Recorder

Portable Workstations

Utilizing the iPhone’s built-in audio interface, these apps are in essence simplified digital audio workstations used to record or program multi-track song ideas. The tracks can then be exported to a computer for later editing. They include:

  • Cleartune Chromatic Tuner
  • ioMetrics GigBaby!
  • Novation Automap 3
  • Sonoma Wire Works FourTrack
  • Thezi Studio Metronome TS

Remote Control Apps

These apps allow Pro-Audio engineers to control digital audio workstations (DAWs) or other hardware devices from the iPhone. They are specific to the DAWs in use, and have the ability to control the various virtual knobs, fader and buttons. Some of the more popular are:

  • Far Out Labs ProRemote
  • Hexler TouchOSC
  • Steinberg Cubase iC

Tell us what you think!

Which Pro-Audio iPhone apps have you used and which can you not live without?

Interested in becoming an audio engineer? Learn more about Cogswell’s Digital Audio Technology bachelor degree programs at http://www.cogswell.edu/programs/digital-audio-technology.php

Cogswell Game Studio & Barron Park Elementary School

April 3rd, 2014

Cogswell Game Studio & Barron Park Elementary School

Barron Park ElementaryCogswell Game Studio, a project-based learning course, visited Barron Park Elementary on Thursday, March 6, 2014 for the first “play test” of their game Tangram Jam.

A “play test” is a quality insurance process in game development where an alpha or beta version of a game is tested in a controlled environment. The team took both a PC pre-alpha build and mobile versions of the user interface for 3rd grade students to experience.  While the game is fun, it is also a ‘serious game’; it teaches math concepts to students.

Arlinda Smith (teacher) and Magdelna Frittoria (Principal) welcomed the Cogswell students form the game development team into a 3rd grade class at Barron Park Elementary.  The elementary school students were enthusiastic to give feedback on the game and what they found to be fun elements.  Cogswell game design art and engineering students took metrics on game play performance and observed what the children were enjoying and learning during game play.

During this play test session, the team also found several things to improve the play of the game for the students.

Cogswell Game Studio is part of the curriculum and process in the Game Design & Development program.

It was a wonderful experience and we learned a lot. We were able to observe how the kids responded to the music, models and interface. We found out why they liked or didn’t like certain aspects of the game as well as what they would do differently with the game. My focus was seeing if the kids understood the interface. I was surprised at how easily the kids navigated through the interface as if they’ve done it a thousand times before. [We] tried to make the UI as clear and understandable as possible and we definitely nailed it with this one. I’m looking forward to the next school visit because we’ve prepared an even better game to present.

~ Shawn Sercombe, Cogswell student

ElementaryElementary 2

Entrepreneurs: Born this Way

April 3rd, 2014

3 Traits Ingrained in as Entrepreneurial DNA


The term “entrepreneur” has become quite the buzzword in recent years. What was once synonymous with starting and managing one’s own business, now has evolved to encompass traits of the trade such as risk-taking and business-savvy. One no longer needs to operate a brick and mortar business to be deemed “entrepreneurial”.

An entrepreneur identifies a need and quickly fulfills it. They are compelled to act without regard to habitual nay-sayers. They see a company or industry lacking in certain areas, and help them problem-solve the opportunities that business owners often times didn’t even know needed fixing.

While the traits necessary to be an entrepreneur can be cultured, the entrepreneurial spirit is more inherent. Classic entrepreneurs possess characteristics that set them apart from the Mark Cuban-wannabes. Here are three of those traits:

Ingenious Problem Solving

At the core, entrepreneurs are able to see a problem, or an area where a company is lacking, and creatively solve it. Creativity doesn’t always equate to iambic pentameter prose poetry. It’s a more of a process or mindset; How to cut off the crusts without using a knife. As much as we hate clichés, “Thinking outside the box” describes entrepreneurs perfectly.

Risks: Forget the Parachute

Risks may be calculable, but not to entrepreneurs. Though failure is not an option to entrepreneurs, it is a distinct possibility However, this doesn’t faze the true entrepreneur, even though the risks are not only monetary; sometimes the entrepreneur is risking reputation as well. Being your own boss means that you make tough decisions without benefit of a parachute.

Could Sell Ice to an Eskimo

Negotiating skills are essential for every business owner. Fear of rejection is not part of the entrepreneur’s genetics. They live by the mantra that “everything is negotiable” IE: leases, sales contracts and salaries, just to name a few. Effective and creative negotiation skills will help save money, and make money to keep businesses running at peak efficiency.

While all of these skills are essential to possess when starting a business venture, schooling helps young entrepreneurs hone in and learn to apply those skills in real life. Cogswell’s Master’s Degree in Entrepreneurship & Innovation teaches how to refine entrepreneurial skills needed to create, establish and grow their own ventures.

The 100 Best April Fool’s Day Hoaxes of All Time

April 1st, 2014

Tricks, and Pranks, and Hoaxes…OH MY!

Has someone ever ambushed you with falling water, or saran wrapped your car doors shut? Are you plotting your revenge as we speak? Well, consider those child’s play next to the Top 100 April Fool’s Day Hoaxes of All Time. The pranks are judged by notoriety, creativity, and number of people duped.

From the BBC convincing viewers of a booming season for spaghetti trees, to Burger King announcing the new addition of the Left-Handed Whopper to the menu; these hoaxes are sure to make you chuckle. What’s most impressive about these hoaxes, is the sheer amount of people that fall for them! We can’t blame them, though, the planning and execution of these appear to be flawless.

If that list isn’t enough inspiration for you today, get your fix by checking out the April Fool Archive for even more, well executed pranks!

Have a prank you want to share? Leave us a comment below!

Sound Design: An Ear for Detail

March 27th, 2014

Crash, Bang, Boom, – Snap, Crackle, Pop – Slam, Bam, Shazam – Not only are these onomatopoetic, but also harmonic gold to sound designers and editors alike. Sounds often make or break video content, and knowing what works takes more than just a keen ear for detail. Sound designers combine the art and science of sound to create the perfect fit for television, film, and video game content.

Editor vs. Designer

Recently, the lines between a sound director and that of a sound editor have been blurred. The major difference being that a sound director is a glorified editor of sorts. A sound editor is responsible for the existing sound – i.e. editing of the dialogue syncing, and removal of extraneous background noise.

On larger budget productions a sound designer is brought in to not only oversee the work of the sound editors, but is also responsible for crafting new sounds – i.e. laser gun fights, cars exploding, tornado wind storms, etc.  Sound designers are also responsible for creating the overall emotional atmosphere of the scene. What sound additions/subtractions would create more tension, suspense, or comedy?

Job Description

Sound designers tend to work long hours with strict deadlines. Depending on a production’s budget, sound designers may start their work months in advance of filming. There is a large level of strategy and organization required in order to conceptualize the production in its entirety. A sound designer must forecast and plan out what sounds he or she will have to create, verses what can be shot organically.

A vast technical knowledge is required in order to digitally create, mix, edit, and distort sound. Sound effects are then layered into the production along with dialogue and music. On the flip side, a vast creative knowledge is also required for designers to fashion new sounds where one had not yet existed. Designers get innovative, and use everyday objects to create new sounds – i.e. crunching cellophane to imitate a fire crackling, or flexing a large sheet of aluminum to replicate thunder.

Sound design is a highly competitive area, and jobs are based on experience. Education is vital to develop an ear for detail. Interested in a career in sound editing or design? Check out Cogswell’s Digital Audio Technology program to develop and fine tune your skills!

10 Most Influential Games of the 80s

March 25th, 2014

It’s no secret that video games were a great deal different back in the 1980’s; from classics we still see today to the games that didn’t live to see the next decade. Remember the original versions of SimCity (1989), The Legend of Zelda (1987), John Madden Football (1988), and Super Mario Bros. (1985)? What about the always classic Pac-Man (1980) and Tetris (1987)? One component we can all likely agree on, however, is the fact that the ghosts of gaming past have paved the way and made a huge impact on the gaming industry we see today. This Yahoo article gives their picks of the 10 most influential games of the 1980s, but we’ll let you be the judge on which games were the most impactful from that decade.

What would you add to their list? How would you rank the games? Give us your two cents below!

Sound Design Student Brings Animated Clip to Life

March 20th, 2014

Sound Design student, Maya Rybold, left her culinary arts dreams for Cogswell’s Digital Audio Technology degree program. We asked Maya to talk about her creative process while adding sound to an animated clip for a class project. Watch the video below for a peek into what it takes to bring an animated clip from the movie ‘Ratatouille’ to life with the implementation of music and sound effects.

Have a comment or question for Maya? Submit responses below.

Free-to-Play Games on the Rise

March 18th, 2014

Many experts in the game design industry predict that the rising trend in free-to-play games will continue during 2014 and the foreseeable future. Insiders and outsiders alike are of the opinion that free-to-play was just for mobile and browser titles, but that’s not the case.

Some high quality offerings have become available over the last couple of years and with the success they’ve experienced, more are planned. Full games such as Team Fortress 2, League of Legends, PlanetSide 2, and Star Wars: The Old Republic have all launched on the free-to-play platform.

There are definitely pros and cons to free-to-play. On the positive side, people can try the game and play for extended periods of time before spending money. Casual gamers can enjoy playing without paying monthly fees. It offers a cheap entertainment alternative.

The flip side is that free isn’t free in a lot of cases, and it’s difficult to tell when you first start playing how much it will cost to maintain interest or stay competitive because many players will choose to add options. Some options give players a competitive advantage, hence the allegations of “pay to win,” and many players are willing to buy anything and pay any price to win.

How game designers make money with free-to-play games

It seems counter-intuitive that a game designer would make money for a free game, but they can actually make more money if done correctly by offering it for free rather than a pay-to-play model.

Through micro-transactions, (generally $1-$5) game designers make options available to enhance the player’s experience. Some purists decry this as “pay to win,” but many of the things you can buy in the cash shop are cosmetic options to differentiate players from each other.

Free-to-play games also monetize through advertising. Many have ads that pop up during breaks; in-game advertising banners placed throughout the game simulate advertising at sporting events. In-game adverting affects the game as little as possible.

It’s estimated that the free-to-play version of Team Fortress 2 generated 12 times the revenue of its subscription counterpart. So if it’s done well, game designers will find the free-to-play platform very lucrative.

As a consumer, do you use free-to-play games, or spend a little extra to enjoy an ad free gaming experience?