Archive for the ‘Software Engineering’ Category

3D Displays through QR Codes

Friday, November 28th, 2014

Image credit goes to Gizmag.com and The Optical Society A "lenslet" sheet is placed over a smartphone screen to show a 3D image

A team of engineers led by Bahram Javidi (Professor of Electrical Engineering) from the University of Connecticut have found a way to display 3D images by simply scanning a series of QR codes, without needing use of the internet. This is possible due to the storing of compressed and encrypted images, which can be easily scanned, decrypted, and decompressed by commercial smartphones for secure 3D visual communication. This process is done by selecting the primary image to be visualized. This could be either a single 3D object, or an entire 3D scene. The 3D image is then broken down by taking multiple 2D images of it from multiple perspectives called elemental images. Each elemental image is taken from one portion of a precisely oriented array of tiny lenses called lenslets. The lenslet then captures the scene from many slightly offset perspectives. The elemental images are then split into two essential parts: the unique perspective of the 3D scene and the corresponding intensity information. This system is still in the concept stage and not yet available for commercial use however, the researchers believe that their system can be improved to produce higher quality 3D visual images and a more secure integration with smartphone technology.

Peter Gazallo
Digital Art & Animation Student

OM3D – 3D Manipulation of 2D Photos

Friday, November 14th, 2014

When it comes to editing photographs, Photoshop reigns supreme. But what if there was a better approach to editing a photograph? What if you could take an element within a picture and have full manipulation control over everything about it? Better yet, what if you could do it for free? Researchers over at Carnegie Mellon and the University of California found a way to do just that – through the announcement of a new, free, suite of 3D manipulation software. Their software, titled OM3D, allows a user to take an object within a 2D photograph and turn it into a 3D model. That model can then be manipulated and moved around the photo however the user desires. It also allows the users to adjust the lighting and texture of an object in order to blend in with its surroundings. The software achieves this by utilizing vast libraries of stock photographs and 3D models, and compares them to the two dimensional object the user wishes to shape. It then merges the attributes from the library of stock photos with that of the 2D object to create a 3D model that is viewable from every angle. Once the model is created, the photograph can be freely edited.


Demonstration: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipTyCJi0t1Y
Download: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~om3d/code/OM3D_1_0_0_source.zip

Marketing Your Mobile App – Advice from the Federal Trade Commission

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

As mobile app developers soon discover, coming up with a great idea and then building the mobile app is only just the beginning. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) – the nation’s consumer protection agency – it’s never too soon to start thinking about making sure your app is compliant with current commerce regulations.

While every app is different, there are some general guidelines that every developer should be thinking about:

  • Truthful advertising: Don’t make claims your app can’t deliver. One rule of thumb: Look at your product and your advertising from the perspective of average users, not just software engineers or app experts. If you make objective claims about your app, you need solid proof to back them up before you start selling.
  • Disclose key information clearly and conspicuously: The goal is to make sure they are big enough and clear enough that users actually notice them and understand what they say.
  • Build privacy considerations in from the start: You accomplish this by limiting the information you collect, securely storing what you hold on to and safely disposing of what you no longer need.
  • Be transparent about your data practices: Explain what information your app collects from users or their devices and what you do with their data.
  • Offer choices that are easy to find and easy to use: Give your users ways to control how their personal information is collected and shared.
  • Honor your privacy promises: Reread your privacy policy or what you say about your privacy settings. Chances are you make assurances to users about the security standards you apply or what you do with their personal information.
  • Protect kids’ privacy: You have additional requirements under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and the FTC’s COPPA Rule so make sure you know what they are.
  • Collect sensitive information only with consent: Get your OK before you collect any sensitive data from them.
  • Keep user data secure: Under the law, you have to take reasonable steps to keep sensitive data secure.

The article contains some helpful links giving you access to additional information.

Get Your Fat Mobile Apps in Shape

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Some app developers may create their app for love but most also want to bring a little money into their lives as well. Dale Carr, founder and CEO of LeadBolt says with all of the changes that developers in the mobile app industry face, it may be time to get some of the lead out of your apps and make them leaner and meaner.

In this article in DevsBuildIt, he offers realistic and achievable fitness tips to help your app monetization strategy shape up to all it should be in 2014:

  • Trim the fat: Don’t overstuff your app with ads by placing banners in every conceivable place. Think of your user experience first and be more strategic about ad placement.
  • Exercise different muscles: Connecting with your user in different ways is like exercising different muscles. To achieve results and continue to convert energy consistently, switch up your routine and target more than one area. Evaluate the entire usage cycle of your app.
  • Pay attention to your vitals: Resolve to measure your app performance by paying attention to analytics. In the article he offers ideas for app analytics to help you achieve optimal results.

What app monetization ideas have worked for you?

How to Create an Effective App Demo Video

Friday, February 7th, 2014

You’ve built a great app that you are sure will have a large audience. The next question is how do you get the word out – you know, market it. Many app developer are turning to demo videos to entice potential users to check it out and from there hopefully download it.

So what are some elements that lead to a successful demo video? According to this article in DevsBuildIt by Sean Casto, CEO of Alliance member PreApps, here are a few tips:

  • Choose your tools carefully
  • Don’t shy away from creativity
  • Harness the power with a strong voice
  • Keep it to the point
  • Hook the viewers

Please share links to any great demo videos you have seen.

The Engineering Behind Making Cool Sounds on Your Guitar

Monday, January 27th, 2014

At Cogswell students are given the flexibility to weave personal interests into class projects as long as they are relevant. Engineering student, Edward Aslanian, turned his passion for guitar and playing around with creating different sounds into an interest in engineering.

For one of his final class presentations, he explored how analog delay impacts the sounds produced by his guitar. This short video gives you an overview of his presentation and findings.

Sony Shines in Golden Globe Ad

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Bringing together art and engineering talent.

Sony is running a multifaceted media campaign that harkens back to their early days of innovation and pushing the envelope. They ran an ad during the Golden Globes award show that got to the heart of their philosophy. When I watched the video clip, all I could think was that sure looks like a day at Cogswell College.

They say, “When you combine the artist with the engineers, you get something really new – something special.” The ad went on to say, “when great thinkers combine with great doers, 1 + 1 can equal 3.” So true! Great things happen when you create an environment that encourages – and even demands – collaboration across disciplines.

Walk into any classroom at Cogswell, step into the student lounge or listen to conversations taking place in our hallways – and you know you are in a unique place. Students and faculty are passionate about what they do and are eager to learn from each other.

Our next Open House is February 22. Why not RSVP now and come see for yourself how well we have integrated art and engineering? Step into our world of possibilities.

So you Want to Start a Software Company?

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

If this is your dream, you are not alone. As witnessed in here in Silicon Valley and around the globe – the opportunities opened up by mobile apps have made this a popular choice for setting off on your own. This article in Computing Now contains important information to help you start off on the right foot.

Some of the issues covered include:

  • Your most important asset – people
  • Founders don’t see the world the same way as employees
  • It’s ‘our standard contract’ is rarely true
  • Find out what people need, make it, tell them and get them to pay you

What other issues would you like to see discussed about starting a software company?

What Does it Take to Bring a Software Engineering Idea to Life

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

Ed Hartwig & Zach Childers

You have an idea for a great – or at least intriguing – software project but how do you get started? This short video featuring an animatronic dragon’s head project designed by two Cogswell students offers insight into the development stage.

The project started over the summer as part of a special projects class in conjunction with San Jose’s TechShop. Zach and Ed wanted to build something that would resonate with the Cogswell community and be an inspiration for getting artists and engineers to collaborate.

While they still have a way to go before their prototype becomes the finished piece they envision, they have a solid plan in place to reach their goal.

Cogswell College is Happy to be the Exception in Educating Software Engineers

Monday, November 4th, 2013

We often hear about the great job prospects for software engineering grads but according to this article in Dark Reading by Gunter Ollmann, many new grads are finding the scope of those jobs limited by their lack of real-world experience. Mr. Ollmann says that the crux of the problem boils down to colleges missing two critical educational opportunities:

  1. In most colleges students predominantly work on individual assignments rather than collaborative projects.
  2. The vast majority of assignments require students to create code from scratch instead of working on code written by someone else.

Project-based learning is a hallmark of a Cogswell College education. Students have numerous opportunities to work in teams of artists, animators, audio specialists and software engineers and gain the experience they need to become a valuable asset to future employers.