Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Patrick Osborne to Deliver Cogswell Commencement Address

Monday, May 11th, 2015

Source: Animation Magazine

Sunnyvale, CA — Cogswell College, a 600-student educational institution offering a unique curriculum fusing Digital Art, Engineering and Entrepreneurship, will host Academy Award-winning animation director Patrick Osborne (“Feast”) during the school’s commencement ceremonies on May 16th. The event begins at 11 AM, and will be held at Club Auto Sport in San Jose, CA.

Based on the theme of “Learning to enjoy the blank page in front of you,” Osborne’s keynote will address Cogswell’s Class of 2015.

“It is such an honor and privilege to have Patrick Osborne, a brilliant and gifted animation industry director, agree to speak to our students on one of the most important days in their lives — college graduation,” said Dr. Deborah Snyder, Cogswell College’s President & Chief Academic Officer. “His exceptional talent serves as a role model for many of our students who aspire to walk in his footsteps. We are so grateful he is willing to share his experience and ideas with our students, as they embark upon the next phase of their careers.”

Osborne is the winner of a 2015 Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film for his original short film, Feast. Starting in 2008, he worked in-house with Walt Disney Animation Studios, where he animated on Bolt, Tangled and Wreck it Ralph, and acted as Head of Animation on the Oscar winning Paperman. In addition, Osborne was also the co-head of animation on the smash hit animated feature film, Big Hero 6.

Osborne began his professional career as an Animator at Sony Pictures Imageworks, where he animated on an assortment of films, including I Am Legend and Surf’s Up. He later worked at gaming company Electronic Arts, Inc., where he contributed to the Tiger Woods PGA Tour 2003 videogame title.

Born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, he is a 2003 graduate from the Ringling College of Art and Design with a BFA in Computer Animation. Osborne lives with his wife, Ali, in the Silver Lake area of Los Angeles.

Source Article: Animation Magazine

Juan Rubio

Goodbye to Cogswell

Friday, May 8th, 2015

It passed by in a flash, just like I’d expected it to when I first arrived here. To be honest, some days did drag on especially long—mostly during finals week when I was running on empty and animating furiously at 3 in the morning. Even during the roughest spots of my education here at Cogswell, I always felt blessed that I was doing what I loved and never regretted the amount of work that went into it. Whenever I had doubts, I would remind myself, ‘you could be in nursing school right now,’ and instantly whatever difficult project I was working on didn’t seem so bad anymore. Getting to do what I loved every single day was a luxury that it seems I’d fought my entire life to have.

I definitely learned some important and valuable lessons during my time here. Some I’ve noticed as a bystander, others up close and personally. I’d like to list a few here.

1. Don’t wait for things to change, be proactive and be the change.
One of the biggest problems I’d see around school were plenty of students complaining about their lives or the way things were run. A lot of whining, but very few people taking the time to make a change or coming up with solutions for problems. This may sound harsh, but if people put the same amount of energy into just making things happen rather than constantly expressing dissatisfaction, we’d be in a different place altogether.

2. The connections you make now will carry on to the future.
You know the kids you’re going to school with? Take a good look, because chances are you’ll be working with them later. Don’t be a jerk. Share cookies. Give positive feedback rather than dismissing their efforts at what they’re trying to do. The relationship you’re forming now could be the key to establishing good connections in the industry later.

3. Don’t be arrogant.
Yes, be confident in your work and what you can bring to the table… but please don’t be that person that’s so absorbed in their work that they come off sounding hypercritical and judgmental all the time. Always be willing to take criticism and advice, and be supportive instead of condemning. You’ll be kicking yourself later when you try to get into an industry full of extremely talented people who by contrast are actually willing to listen and learn.

4. Always be willing to work hard.
It will pay off. If you want to be an artist badly enough, a strong work ethic comes automatically. The desire to design or create will overpower the one to veg out and binge-watch the entire series of Doctor Who (just barely) Remember that you are competing against tons of people talented and obsessed with their craft. You just have to be better and even more obsessed!

While it’s exciting to get out into the real world and make things happen, it’s also difficult to leave the school where I’ve spent the last three years of my life. As the building is going to be demolished, it’s sad knowing that everything’s going to be torn down and that the place I’ve practically lived in will no longer exist. Cogswell will continue of course, but this building in particular holds special memories.

To the remaining and future students; work hard, play hard, and I want to see you guys do some great stuff! Go Cogswell!

Sierra Gaston

Google’s Project Tango at Cogswell College

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Recently, a small group from Google visited Cogswell College to teach a class about and demonstrate Project Tango. What is Project Tango exactly? Project Tango is a brand new mobile device that has the ability to navigate the world, similar to us humans. It’s an Android device/platform that has spatial perception, and accomplishes this by using advanced computer vision, image processing, and special vision sensors.

One may think, “That’s all fine and cool, but what does this thing do exactly? And what practical applications can be derived from such a technology?”. To put it simply, what Tango does is continuously scan the surrounding environment as the user walks around with the hand-held device, and then it uses the data it collects to construct a 3D model of the environment. It uses motion tracking to give real time info about it’s motion through 3D space.  It also uses depth sensors for depth perception (allowing for interactions between the real world and the virtual world Tango has built/is building) and it can learn new areas intelligently. If there are any errors with the 3D model it has created, Tango can use visual cues around the space to re-render and fix trouble areas. The potential applications for such a technology includes, but isn’t limited to, new Virtual Reality or AR games and applications, video games, rapid environment generation, and more. The potential is limited only by imagination.

The Cogswell class, which is currently learning to use Unity, was tasked with testing the devices, running an application, and providing feedback as they went along. Google called it a Code Lab event, the purpose of which was to iron out and fix any bugs in the system before this year’s Google I/O conference in roughly two months. Students debugged Google’s sample instructions, tested and ran the code, and followed development environment instructions – all while under the direction of watchful and curious Google engineers. Google had previously tested these devices at nVidia, but were impressed to see that Cogswell students produced better results and provided higher quality feedback.

For the demo, students were each provided with a Tango tablet device, USB cables, a pin code to unlock the devices, and a URL in which they found further instructions. The students booted up their devices and launched a 3D mapping app which tracked their movements. As they moved around the classroom, the students got feedback through interactive mapping, cloud arrays and more. The students then returned to their workstations to continue the demo. The students went through a series of environments to get an app running in Unity, importing that app into their devices, then running that app on their devices as they moved around. Some students continued with the instructions provided to them, whilst others conversed with the Google engineers.

The success rate of the tests and demos was 100%, much better than other tests that Google had done before. Whenever any of the students would get stuck, they would first work together for a solution, using the Google engineers as a last resort. Working together led all students to success. As the class progressed, the Code Lab event slowly turned into a seminar where students brainstormed potential applications for the technology.  Ideas included a music application for better microphone location/tracking within a room and an app capable of creating 3D sound environments.

All in all, it was a successful demo and everyone walked away with new knowledge – and an amazing experience!

Based on notes from John Duhring’s experience
with additional content and editing by Juan Rubio

Happy Pie Day!

Saturday, March 14th, 2015

Happy Pie Day Everyone!! Midterms are over, Spring Break is right around the corner, and as many would agree, pie is delicious. It can be sweet and evoke memories of simpler times like an apple pie with a buttery flaky crust, just like the ones grandma would make. Or it can be hearty and savory, such as a chicken pot pie packed with flavor. There are fruit pies, meat pies, and many more varieties in between: coconut cream or ice cream pie anyone? Whatever your preferred pastry, one can’t help but wonder, where did this scrumptious dish come from and what were the first sorts of pies?

According to historians, pie-making can be traced back to ancient Greece, thought to have been the originators of the crust, who made it by combining water and flour. Meanwhile, the Romans would fill their pies with many different kinds of meats (even mussels and other types of seafood). Meat pies were often part of Roman dessert courses which they called secundae mensae. Fast forward to the first Thanksgiving here in the United States in 1621. Everyone knows that among the various dishes shared between the Native Americans and the Pilgrims, there was pumpkin pie right?

In reality there is no evidence showing that modern day pie, or even early versions of it, was served at the first Thanksgiving. Pilgrims brought a variety of English-style, meat-based recipes with them to the colonies. The first record of pumpkin pie here in the US was in a cookbook from 1675, originating from British spiced and boiled squash; it wasn’t popularized until the early 1800′s. We don’t know what dishes the Pilgrims served at the first Thanksgiving, but primary documents show they cooked with fowl and venison, and inevitably these ingredients found themselves stuffed in between sheets of dough.

The colonists cooked many pies not only because they were tasty, mind you, but because the crusty top would aid in the preservation of food. This would help to keep the filling fresh, particularly during winter months. Were these early American pies bland? Not exactly. Documents show that Pilgrims would use dried fruits, cinnamon, pepper and nutmeg to season their meats. As the colonies began to expand, so did the reach of pie. The pie acted as an outlet to showcase local ingredients and, with this, the first American sweet pies began to appear.

A cookbook from 1796 listed a mere three types of sweet pies; one from the late 1800′s listed 8 varieties; and by 1947, the Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking listed 65 different kinds of sweet pies. So the saying goes, “There are few things as American as apple pie”, however, like much of America’s pie tradition, the original apple pie recipes hailed from England. These pre-Revolutionary creations were simple, unsweetened apples encased in an edible flour crust. Pies today are a treat eaten around the globe, made with everything from apples to avocados. Pies have come a long way since the heyday of venison and pepper, but whatever the case, there’s surely a pie out there for everyone.

As for me? Kahlua Cream Cheese pie is my favorite. Go out and grab your favorite everybody! Happy Pie Day!

Juan Rubio

Women, Kidneys, and Leprechauns

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

Greetings everyone!

For those not aware of it, Sunday was International Women’s Day, celebrating the achievements of women throughout history. The day also serves to support and encourage women’s equality, and raise awareness of the various issues women face around the world; whether they’re economic, human rights related, or political. The Socialist Party of America designated February 28, 1909 as National Women’s Day. It was celebrated on this day until 1913 when it was moved to March 8th internationally.

One day I’m sure not many people are aware of is World Kidney Day, observed on the second Thursday of March every year. The day seeks to raise awareness of the importance of kidneys to our overall health, and to inform the world about ways to prevent kidney disease. This years theme is Kidney Health for All, appropriate given how important these organs are to our health. Kidneys remove toxic substances and excess water from our bloodstream, which in turn effects blood pressure and chemical balance of the body.

Last but not least is St. Patrick’s day on the 17th! Everyone knows the day means wearing green to avoid being pinched, green beer, parades, Shamrock Shakes, and good times with friends and family, but where did the day come from? St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland, a priest and former slave who helped to convert the Irish to Christianity. He would use the three leafed shamrock to explain the Trinity to non-Christians, which is where the shamrock motif comes from on St. Patrick’s day. The day serves to honor and remember St. Patrick, as well as a day to celebrate Irish culture and heritage in general. Since its origins, Lenten restrictions on eating certain food’s and drinking alcohol were lifted, which is where the practice of social drinking came from.

Please don’t forget to give thanks and appreciate the women in your life and all that they do, wear plenty of green on St. Patrick’s day and celebrate responsibly! Your liver and kidneys will thank you.  Have fun everybody!

Juan Rubio

The Year of the Sheep

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

Happy New Year!!!

Today mark’s the first day of the Chinese New Year! 2015 is the year of the Sheep, Goat, or Ram depending on which region you’re from. And with today being the first day, the festivities begin!

Many celebrate the New Year with 15 days of festivities, even here in the United States, with each day having a different significance and traditions. Under traditional practices, on the first day, the deities of the earth and the heavens are welcomed. It’s also the day where one honors their elder’s and families, with many choosing to visit grandparents and family on this day. It’s traditional to light fireworks and firecrackers today as well, and some families invite a Lion Dance troupe as a symbolic ritual to ward off evil spirits.

The second day is when married daughters visit their birth parents, relatives, and close friends. Traditionally, married daughters wouldn’t have many opportunities to visit so the second day held special significance for them. Every day has its own customs and practices, with certain foods being eaten only on certain days, and special celebrations occurring only at that specific point of the year.

On the 15th day the Lantern Festival is held. The traditional food eaten this day is a sweet, sticky rice ball brewed in a soup, and lanterns are lit outside to guide wayward spirits home. Families walk the street carrying paper lanterns as well. In China, Malaysia and Singapore, the 15th its also a sort of Valentines Day, where single people seek out partners. Normally, single women would write their number or contact information on a mandarin orange (the most abundant fruit in China during the new year) and toss it into a river or lake where single men would pick them up and eat them. A sweet orange would mean a good fate, the relationship would be good and work well. A sour or bitter taste would mean a bad fate, no good.

Another practice most people know about are the red envelopes. Typically, red envelopes filled with money are given to children during the new year for good fortune. Its also typical to give gifts to friends, often assortments of candies and other such items.

In the United States, the San Francisco Chinese New Year Festival and Parade is the oldest celebration of its kind outside of Asia. During the 1850′s gold rush era, Chinese immigrants were eager to share their culture and traditions with those unfamiliar or hostile towards it. In San Francisco, where one of the largest Chinese communities in the US existed and still exists, people showcase their culture using a tradition already loved by the American public: a parade. Today, the parade is attended by over 500,000 people annually, and its televised to over 3 million homes as well. If you have a chance, I recommend it checking it out. I have wonderful memories of great friends and food shared in past years.

Happy Chinese New Year everybody! And to anybody who happens to be a goat, sheep, or ram on the Chinese zodiac, go celebrate! It’s your year, have fun with it.

P.S. If anyone happens to go to San Francisco, please me bring back some Dim Sum. I love that stuff.

Juan Rubio

Cogswell Alumni Mixer

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

On Saturday, April 11th, something pretty exciting will be happening here at Cogswell.

In an effort to create stronger connections between alumni, students and the school, Cogswell will be hosting a mixer event honoring our past students and future graduates. So what can we expect to see at this event?

In addition to having the opportunity to connect with alumni working in the industry from all degree concentrations, students can attend a panel at which graduates will speak about their experiences since leaving the school. All attendees will also have the option to showcase their portfolios and demo reels during the event. (Since this is also this last semester we’ll be in the old building, we will have a pretty fun activity that might involving writing all over the walls—more details on that later!)

Students, be sure to polish those portfolios up pretty well—we will have alumni attending this event who might be interested in hiring!

Sierra Gaston

Incoming Students! Orientation at Cogswell

Thursday, January 15th, 2015


Today marks the beginning of a new semester, and the matriculation of over 30 new students! With each new incoming group comes new potential—I look forward to seeing what talent they have to offer, and what they’ll accomplish in their time here.

I remember when I came in as a transfer student three years ago, and how thrilled I was about the future; I couldn’t wait to learn and improve. Every day I came to school full of excitement, and passionate about what I was being taught. Everything was so very new. I still feel as passionate now, in my last semester, but there’s something extra special about your first year because the possibilities are open and endless. You’re not sure quite where you’re going or how much you’ll achieve at the end, but inside you’re driven by the thrill of possibility to become whatever you want to be.

For the incoming students, I’d like to say welcome and don’t be afraid to dream big. If you work hard and keep your goal in mind, opportunities will find you. Also, don’t be content to just wait for things to fall in your lap—you have to chase after what you want to accomplish.

I’m really excited to see what this new group of students will do with what they’re learning at Cogswell! Welcome freshmen!

Sierra Gaston

COGSWELL COLLEGE TO HOST GLOBAL GAME JAM EVENT AT SILICON VALLEY CAMPUS JANUARY 23-25

Thursday, January 15th, 2015


Sunnyvale, CA, January 13, 2015 — Cogswell College, a leading educational institution offering a unique curriculum fusing Digital Art, Engineering and Entrepreneurship, will serve as one of the international hosts of the 2015 Global Game Jam (GGJ) Event (January 23-25) at its campus in Silicon Valley. Cogswell has been hosting GGJ since 2009, and is one of the original sites to host this unique event in the Bay Area.

To register for the Cogswell-hosted event, please see: http://www.cogswell.edu/ggj2015

The goal behind the annual Global Game Jam (GGJ) is for people from all walks of life to come together and make a video game, or non-digital game like a board game or card game, during one single weekend. Participants rapidly prototype game designs and inject new ideas to help grow the game industry. GGJ asks participants to create a game from beginning to end in a prescribed time (maximum of 48 hours). The brief time span is meant to help encourage creative thinking, always resulting in small but innovative and experimental games.

Regarding the event, Albert Chen, Cogswell’s Assistant Professor, Game Design & Development, said, “The Global Game Jam hosted at Cogswell College exemplifies what Silicon Valley is all about. Within 48 hours, students, alumni, professionals and hobbyists will converge in the spirit of Hewlett & Packard and Jobs & Wozniak, to turn ideas into innovative game prototypes and future game startups. Our students will have another great opportunity by which to learn the value of doing and creating.”

Run by a small international team of volunteers, the annual GGJ is the world’s largest game jam (game creation) event, and takes place around the world at numerous physical locations simultaneously. GGJ is the outgrowth of an idea that in today’s heavily connected world, people can still come together, be creative, share experiences, and express themselves in a multitude of ways by using video games. The weekend stirs a global creative buzz in games, while at the same time exploring the process of development, be it programming, iterative design, narrative exploration or artistic expression. GGJ is condensed into a 48- hour development cycle, and encourages people from diverse backgrounds to participate and contribute to this global spread of game development and creativity.

The structure of each Global Game Jam begins when people gather on a Friday late afternoon, watch a short video keynote with advice from leading game developers, and then receive a “secret theme.” All physical locations that participate in each GGJ event, worldwide, are then challenged to create brand new games based on that same theme. These games are to be completed by the following Sunday afternoon.

ABOUT GLOBAL GAME JAM:

The brainchild of Susan Gold in collaboration with Gorm Lai and Ian Schreiber, the Global Game Jam (GGJ) was founded in 2008, inspired by the many game jams before it, such as the Indie Game Jam, Ludum Dare and Nordic Game Jam. GGJ was a project of the International Game Developer’s Association (IGDA) from 2009-2012. Starting with GGJ 2013, the event has been managed by Global Game Jam, Inc.

The 1st annual Global Game Jam was held in 2009 to much critical acclaim and success. With over 1600 participants in 23 countries, and a theme of “As long as we have each other, we will never run out of problems,” the GGJ produced 370 games. In 2010, the number of participants increased to over 4300 with 900 finished games on the theme of “Deception.” GGJ participants worldwide have continued to dramatically increase in numbers during each subsequent year of this unique event.

GGJ is a volunteer-run organization, built upon the very hard work of its leadership, site organizers, and participants. For more information, please visit: http://globalgamejam.org/about

ABOUT COGSWELL COLLEGE:

Designed as a “fiercely collaborative, living laboratory,” Cogswell College is located in the heart of the legendary Silicon Valley in Sunnyvale, California. The school is a WASC accredited, four-year institution of higher education with a specialized curriculum that fuses digital arts, audio technology, game design, engineering and entrepreneurship.

Numerous alumni of Cogswell College have secured prominent positions within the entertainment, videogame, technology, computer, animation, and motion graphics industries throughout California and beyond. Several of these alumni have established careers with such high profile companies as Activision, DreamWorks Animation, Disney, Electronic Arts, Pixar, and Microsoft Game Studio. Many other alumni have launched their own creative ventures.

Recent Cogswell alumni were members of the Academy Award-winning production teams which worked on the blockbuster films “Frozen” and “Life of Pi.” Some of the other well-known consumer projects to which Cogswell alumni have contributed include the feature films “The Boxtrolls” and “The Avengers,” and the popular videogames “Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare,” “Halo 4” and “Battlefield Hardline.”

Additionally, animated short films conceived and produced by Cogswell students have gone on to win prestigious awards, including those presented by the California International Animation Festival, the Colorado Film Festival, the Oregon Film Festival, the Miami Film Festival, the Philadelphia Film & Animation Festival, the San Jose Short Film Festival, and Canada’s International Film Festival.

Cogswell College is located at 1175 Bordeaux Drive, Sunnyvale, California, 94089. For more information, please call 1-800-264-7955 or visit: http://www.cogswell.edu/

Merry Christmas!

Thursday, December 25th, 2014

Art by Cogswell student Jose Hernandez

Merry Christmas everyone! Hopefully you’re spending the holidays having a jolly old time with your friends and family. Remember, it’s not so much about the presents, but about the relationships and bonds you form and continue to keep throughout the year. Christmas is a time of year where we’re all reminded of those who love us, and those who are near and dear to us as well. So go have some eggnog, grab a mug of hot cocoa, roast some chestnuts, and spend some time with those who are important in your life. Have fun!

Juan Rubio