Archive for the ‘Digital Media Management’ Category

What Does the Game Design Manager Say?

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Screen shot from the video.

At Cogswell College we focus on learning by doing. While we don’t ignore the theory and principles behind a process, we don’t feel the learning is complete until you’ve actually undertaken a project and put the new skills to use.

The Fall Semester ‘Project Management’ class had to break up into teams and then develop promotional materials that would introduce people to one of Cogswell’s majors. The goal of the mid-term project’s assignment was for the collateral developed to interest people in becoming students at Cogswell. In order to successfully complete the project, students had to organize, assign tasks, set up a timetable, deliver the project and then evaluate their results.

“I wanted the finished piece to show the pride they take in their education, why they are excited about what they are doing and what they are about as students,” said Albert Chen, faculty for the class. “The assignment definitely reinforced the skills they learned during the class.”

This short video highlighting Cogswell’s Digital Media Management degree program and its Game Design & Business Modeling major was completed in two weeks by a team of six students. The students who worked on the project are: Vincent Velo, Andrew Traxler, Eric Tran, Frank Maddox, Oleksandra Keehl and Halsey Herms.

Games Made by Committee – Oh, My!

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

Here’s a humorous look at the way a game design plan put together by a committee might pencil out. Apparently, the old adage that too many cooks in the kitchen spoils the stew, also applies to other things in life – including implementing the amazing game design you first envisioned.

Maybe if they had gone through Cogswell’s Digital Media Management program majoring in Game Design & Business Modeling, the game might have come together differently.

Have you ever designed by committee? How did that project work out?

Supercell Embraces Failure

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

It’s time to uncork the champagne – not because the company has released another wildly successful mobile game – but because one of their mobile apps failed. The company is responsible for “Clash of the Clans” and “Hay Day” but has also had games that haven’t been as successful.

“We don’t pretend failing is fun — people dedicate their lives to gaming production and sometimes the products get killed — but we get so much from that failure. We analyze and talk about what went well and what didn’t. We pop a bottle of champagne to celebrate what we learned,” said Supercell CEO Ilkka Paananen in this article in Mashable.

In addition to the company’s quirky attitude about failure, it also fosters numerous ways to encourage creativity and innovation within its employee ranks.

What lessons would you like to implement in your business?

David Kim of Animoca Discusses Challenges of Getting Your App Discovered

Monday, October 28th, 2013

In this short video clip from Devsbuildit, David Kim of Animoca discusses his company and how developers can stand out from the rest of the crowd.  Some of his tips include:

  • Even though we operate in a global marketplace, your global needs a local focus.
  • The best indicator of success is to know your audience.
  • The industry has seen an attitude switch from just ‘getting eyeballs on your game’ to ‘how do I make money.’
  • He has seen a tendency for companies to rely on their brands’ popularity rather than the quality of the product being developed.

What do you think is the most important thing you can do to make sure your intended audience finds your game?

Moonbot Animates Chipotle’s ‘The Scarecrow’ Project

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013

Interactive marketing – what exactly is it? We’re hearing the term more and more but over the past few years consumers are beginning to see this concept in action. As reported in Animation Magazine, here’s a great example is the new animated short and game app created by Moonbot for Chipotle Mexican Grill.

Award-winning Moonbot created “The Scarecrow,” campaign that depicts a scarecrow’s fight to ensure that people have a wholesome alternative to processed food. The game is available for free download in the Apple App Store and the short film can be viewed below and at www.scarecrowgame.com.

The game, designed for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, allows users to visit the animated world and correct the wrongs committed by Crow Foods.

Can you think of other interactive marketing examples? Hint, some of your favorite television shows may have an interactive element.

How to Make Good Decisions Faster

Friday, October 11th, 2013

Do you find yourself analyzing, cross-checking, gathering other opinions and in general, questioning whether or not you are making the best decision possible for your business?

Lee J. Colan, Founder of the L Group, posits in this article for Inc. that business owners can save themselves a lot of time by following the 80/20 rule.

He suggests that first, you should identify the top five pieces of information you need to make the decision. Then select the four that instinctively seem the highest in priority. Now, you will have roughly 80 percent of the information you need and can move forward.

What are the biggest stumbling blocks when you need to make a decision?

The 5 Most Lucrative Animated Films

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

Did you know that the average nationally-released animated feature grosses $87.7 million at the domestic gate (according to Box Office Mojo)?

Universal partner Illumination Entertainment spent less than $80 million to produce which top grossing animated film?

Check out this Slideshare presentation from The Motley Fool for the answers and to find out which films earned the most money. The piece also shares information on costs and revenue for each film.

Were any of the films mentioned in the top grossing list a surprise?

Cogswell College: A Microcosm of Silicon Valley

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

While many regions around the world have access to talented artists and engineers, groundbreaking marketers, infusions of capital and excellent universities – what is it that makes Silicon Valley so special and difficult to reproduce elsewhere?

It’s not in the water but it does seem to be in the air we breathe. We operate differently in the Silicon Valley and have a very different mindset about how to do business. Words often used to describe this unique area include: entrepreneurial, passionate, future-focused, collaborative, high-energy, innovative, creative, techy, team-oriented and willingness to take a chance.

In an article published in the Washington Post, author Victor Hwang, identifies a key element that is often overlooked. Other regions “focus primarily on its ingredients — its obvious assets, like venture capital, skilled workers and universities. What they have largely ignored is its recipe — the social interactions that turn those ingredients into vibrant companies.”

He goes on to state, “arguably, the most important factor in its success has been the formation of a unique culture — one that allows people with diverse skills, who often don’t know each other, to mix and match: collaborating and trusting in ways that people in other cultures don’t. It is not simply creative destruction, as many observers say. More importantly, it is a process of creative reassembly, as people join forces on temporary projects and then recirculate and recombine for other projects later.”

Cogswell College, located in the heart of Silicon Valley, is a true microcosm of Silicon Valley. Within our walls a true collaborative spirit exists. Students, faculty, alumni and external ventures dive into projects and work together to give them life thus gaining valuable collaboration and teamwork competencies. The groups formed bring a diversity of talents, skills, life experiences and perspectives to the task at hand plus an eagerness to learn and desire to create something extraordinary.

Visitors to our campus respond to the natural curiosity and energy permeating Cogswell’s classrooms and labs as teams tackle whatever challenge is in front of them. Whether you are a student in our Undergraduate program or Master’s program Cogswell encourages its students to create, innovate and apply what they have learned in a project-based curriculum that focuses on delivering market-ready products. Students learn to work on teams that mirror real development teams consisting of artists, animators, audio experts and project managers – with software engineering at its core.

With the ability to assemble multidisciplinary teams from within its programs of study, Cogswell College is uniquely positioned to deliver market-ready projects to partner companies and organizations. A sampling of projects we have collaborated on include:

  • Interactive Logo Designs – Cogswell’s Sound Design class developed new logo treatments for Cogswell (seen at the end of the video posted below) and for two different external partner organizations.
  • Interactive Book – Using the latest industry-standard technology, students are working under faculty guidance to create an artistically stunning interactive book (or whatever text Thomas approves).
  • Mobile game – Prairie Rainbow develops table top games to help younger students learn math concepts. Cogswell students are developing a mobile game version of the company’s Rainbow Squares learning tool.

Cogswell also encourages it students to develop their own projects through and supports their efforts. Original student development projects include: game development, operating student store, 3D printing and audio theater projects.

One of the things that sets Silicon Valley apart from other tech development centers, is the sharing of ideas and expertise. Few days go by without an opportunity to attend meetups, salons, hackathons, live/work houses, clubs and industry-specific events. Most have an open door policy – if you are interested in whatever the topic, stop by to learn and network. There is an accessibility to successful entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley unavailable in other tech regions largely fostered by the area’s culture of sharing knowledge with the next generation of entrepreneurs.

At Cogswell College we bring all the pieces together in one place. Our students have the opportunity to collaborate with other students who possess a diverse range of skills and interests on projects, they have access to Silicon Valley thought leaders and a long history of innovation and cutting-edge education. Cogswell College truly is a microcosm of Silicon Valley.

Check out this video to learn more about how Cogswell mirrors the Silicon Valley ecosystem.

A Guide to Video Game Kickstarter Funding

Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

In case you’ve been thinking about creating a Kickstarter campaign for one of your projects, here’s a handy – and very detailed – guide to answer all your questions. With a whopping 32 chapters, this online guide covers everything.

Chapter topics include: setting goals, structuring rewards, popularity rankings, building community, dealing with objections, the last 48 hours and so much more.

Let us know if you ran a Kickstarter campaign and how it went.

10 Startups That Are Changing the Music Industry

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Once upon a time, you either turned on the radio and listened to your favorite DJ spin popular tunes or you went to the music store and purchased  a record (a big, flat plastic disc with grooves that when placed on a record player magically produced sounds) so you could play what you wanted, when you wanted.

But the times and technology has changed – and so has the music industry. This slideshare presentation by the Biz Journal, highlights 10 companies that are making waves within the industry. Check out what they have to say about Spins.FM, Tomahawk, Lisnr, Vyclone, Songza, Songkick, NoiseTrade, SoundCloud, Murfie and Bandcamp.

Are there other companies you think should be on the list?