Archive for the ‘Digital Art’ Category

Double Fine Productions Hosting Fan Day

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

Double Fine Productions has announced that it is hosting a special “Day of the Devs” event on November 2. The event is open to the public and in addition to meeting the great Double Fine crew – which includes several Cogswell graduates – guests will mingle with other indie developers and have the chance to test the company’s new Kickstarter-funded game, “Broken Age.”

Learn more about the event at GamePolitics.com or RSVP at the Day of the Devs website.

Day of the Devs will take place at Public Works at 161 Erie St. in San Francisco from 4-8 p.m. on November 2. The event is free to attend, though no one under 21 will be allowed in, likely due to alcohol being on-site.

Independence High School After School Program

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

Faculty,Tony Dias, helps students with the day's lesson. Tony graduated from Independence High.

Cogswell College and Independence High School have teamed up to introduce high school students to the exciting opportunities that blending art and technology opens to them. Over the course of 10 weeks students choose either digital painting or audio desktop production for the first 5 weeks and software engineering or video game design for the final 5 weeks.

“The goal of this program is to get students excited about something they might initially think is boring,” says Abraham Chacko, executive director of admissions and facilitator for the after school program at Cogswell College. “These are kids from the Silicon Valley,” Chacko continues. “When they hear the word ‘engineering,’ they think ‘I don’t want to have a job like my parents,’ but when you mention Disney, Pixar or video games and the job opportunities associated with them, they become excited about learning programming and engineering skills.”

Faculty, Reid Winfrey, offers design tips to students on the day's lesson.

The demand for skilled engineers in the U.S. continues to grow, with engineering degree holders experiencing some of the best job prospects in the country straight out of college. Jack Aiello is a Project Lead The Way trained instructor who teaches Introduction Engineering Design at Independence High, and is coordinator of the pre-engineering program, Space Technology Engineering Academy Magnet (STEAM). He serves as the faculty facilitator for the after-school program, in partnership with Chacko and uses a project-based, individualized teaching method similar to Cogswell’s.

“The ability to connect and engage our students in Cogswell’s environment is incredible,” says Aiello. “Running a class with 25 students working in a project-based environment is more advantageous than a traditional teaching model with lectures or video presentations at the front of a classroom of 35 or more students. The hands-on computer and audio equipment, programming tools and Industry experienced instructors available at Cogswell allow our students an exciting peek into the real world of the digital creative arts. At the end of each of our two hour weekly sessions at Cogswell, the students walk away with a feeling of accomplishment and pride for what they have created. They are enthusiastic and look forward to coming back next week.  Our students are on the consumer side of the ‘Digital Divide’, many from immigrant families that use technology, social media and video games, but don’t know how to leverage the technology to create something NEW; such as designing a video game, making an animated movie, or producing their own music. ”

Learn more in this news item.

Studio E Embarks on an Interactive Adventure

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

At Cogswell College we believe that the best lessons are those learned by doing. Our newest studio class – Studio E – is no exception. Students in this class under the leadership of faculty, Thomas Applegate, have an ambitious goal but are confident of success. The crew of 18 is creating the art assets, 3D reference models, animation, programming and audio content for an original story created by Thomas.

Over the course of the next 18 months, the team will create a short animation based on the story along with an interactive book version for mobile platforms to deepen the reader’s experience and further immerse them in the story. Students will take the project from the beginning development phase, through pre-production, then full production mode and finally post production. During the class students are given the chance to work in a setting that mirrors a professional studio and will follow an industry-standard production pipeline.

But in typical Cogswell fashion, the learning process has a twist. While the crew adheres to a full-blown production cycle, much of the work in the various phases will be done in tandem. Pre-production will happen in step with the development phase and some full production will happen while pre-production is still going on. This is possible because everyone works on the same files so the work can progress in stages. Environment artists create temporary environments that can be filled in later while character artists and animators can do rough animation in the temporary environment so they don’t have to wait for the finished environments to do their jobs.

“I really want the students to go through the entire design process and learn what is expected of them when they begin working in the industry,” said Applegate. “We started with the story and the visual design, then created a full 2D animatic, from which we are drawing all our information to create the pre-vis animatic, animation, color script, as well as color and lighting keys to establish art direction.”

In addition Cogswell’s learn-by-doing class format, students work on state-of-the-art equipment. Studio E is equipped with Wacom Cintiq monitors which allow you to paint right on the monitor. According to several of the students it took a little adjusting to transition from drawing on a desktop tablet to drawing on a monitor but the consensus is that this is one of the best classes they have taken.

Check out the video for more information stay tuned to find out how the project progresses.

The 5 Most Lucrative Animated Films

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

Did you know that the average nationally-released animated feature grosses $87.7 million at the domestic gate (according to Box Office Mojo)?

Universal partner Illumination Entertainment spent less than $80 million to produce which top grossing animated film?

Check out this Slideshare presentation from The Motley Fool for the answers and to find out which films earned the most money. The piece also shares information on costs and revenue for each film.

Were any of the films mentioned in the top grossing list a surprise?

What’s your color IQ?

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Can you pick out the perfect hue or saturation for the sample colors? How good are you at identifying complimentary or triadic colors?

Take this simple test at color.method to find out.

Share it if you had fun!

Puzzle Game Project Class Gets Underway

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

In a recent Skype call on a large monitor at the front of the classroom, George Gagnon, Founder of Prairie Rainbow Company, met with students and faculty for an introductory session to clarify parameters for the project and to present the concepts the two student teams developed in a 48 hour turnaround.

The eleven students enrolled in the class were divided into two teams and tasked with creating a video game version of the Rainbow Squares table top game. Rainbow Squares is a puzzle game designed for elementary, secondary or adult learners to use as an individual or group learning tool. The game consists of six squares, each made up of three different rainbow-colored pieces. Each of these pieces can be used to form other squares using two, four, five or six pieces or can be used to learn addition and fractions.

“Rainbow Math Models are designed to engage students and let them learn through the method that is best for them,” said George. “Feelings learners get to build a physical model, image learners can create a visual model, while language learners have the chance to hear, read, or write a number model,” added George.  “I think by offering Rainbow Squares as a virtual learning tool, more students will have access to the learning method that works for them.”

After students introduced themselves, a representative from each team outlined the concepts they were considering for the game design.

The Red Team started with general ideas and then branched out. They thought it was important for the video game to represent the physical game since the product has been so successful. The team’s goal is to make students want to play the game over and over. They also discussed implementing different levels for different shapes such as one level to focus on manipulating squares, another for pentagons and another for triangles. Other ideas involved creating a limited moves mode or an addition mode with each block being assigned a numerical value. The team would also like to explore a multiplayer option.

The Blue Team first wanted to know if George would prefer a more structural approach to presenting the concepts of addition and fractions or would he consider a more spatial representation of the math concepts through graphs or perhaps as weights on a scale. Would he like the final game to be more session-based play or individual play? If he would like a more structural approach to teaching the concepts, then they are thinking about a more traditional approach with something like Tetris.

“I love the creativity the teams have put into the process. I’m excited about what I’ve heard today and can’t wait to see the finished products,” said George.

Creating Interactive Books: An Interview with Author, Roxie Munro

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

Since one of Cogswell College’s newest project-based class involves creating interactive books, we thought it would be fun to hear from someone in the industry. In this interview in Digital Book World, Beth Bacon talks to children’s author and illustrator, Roxie Munro.

During the interview, Roxie shares her thoughts and lessons learned when converting from traditional children’s book author to interactive children’s stories. Roxie talks about making the transition from children’s books to apps, the most difficult thing about this new form of storytelling, the future of children’s books and what advice she has for other creative people in this industry.

Can’t wait to see what our Interactive Studio class creates!

Special Effects Are More Then Blowing Things Up

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Much of the time special effects teams spend working on a film is on the task of creating the environment the viewer expects to see – but that environment either wasn’t available where the filming took place or for some other reason was just not practical to capture with a camera. Enter the deft hand of the special effects artists.

This fascinating article by Ian Failes in fxguide.com offers a tantalizing peek behind the scenes of several films from 2011. The first behind the scenes look is from the film, “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.” Fredrik Nord, Visual Effects Supervisor at The Chimney Pot in Stockholm, and his team created the MI:6 ‘Circus’ archive set in Softimage, complete with textured bookshelves, stairs, beams and pipes. Check out the videos and before and after photos of some of the scenes the artists created.

The article also covers the work of special effects in: “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1,” “Machine Gun Preacher,” “Jack and Jill,” “Young Adult,” and “Dolphin Tale.”

Animation for Game Class Video

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

The Animation for Game class worked hard all summer – producing 30+ assignments over the course of the summer.

Near the end of the summer, they held an Open House to show off their work. Faculty member, Jonali Bhattacharyya who teaches the class, said she was really pleased with the quantity and quality of work the students produced. “I wanted them to learn how to work under the pressure of a real work situation,” said Jonali.

Here are a few video clips taken during the Open House as faculty, staff and students tested out the video games. Clip one. Clip two. Clip three.

Envisioning Disney Characters in Real Life

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

If Ariel from the “Little Mermaid” was a real person, what would she look like? Or Jasmine from “Aladdin?”

Here’s is one artist’s concept of what the model of the animation might have looked like.

Do you think the artist, Jirka Väätäinen, whose images are posted on Behance, has captured the essence of the characters?