Archive for the ‘Digital Art’ Category

Cogswell Student’s Artwork Featured On Kotaku!

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014
Matt Bard

Dungeonesque Walls

One of our students, Matt “Bardler” Bard, had his polycount rock formation featured on Kotaku as, “A rather magnificent-looking, somewhat dungeonesque wall from Bardler”

Clicker here for the article!

Awesome job, Matt!

DreamWorksTV Hits YouTube With Shrek the Ogre ‘Vlogger’

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

DreamWorks Animation has launched its YouTube arm, DreamWorksTV, with a slew of “vloggers” that you’ve come to know on the big screen (including Shrek, Puss in Boots and Kung Fu Panda) — and quite a few original newcomers, too.

As of Monday morning, DWA is officially cashing in on the No. 1 reason it bought Awesomeness TV for $33 million plus incentives last year: so it could leverage its popular animated characters online and help launch a bunch of new ones.

DreamWorksTV “combines DreamWorks Animation’s expertise as a global family entertainment brand with the digital savvy of AwesomenessTV,” the company said in a statement. DWA also shared several video clips exclusively with Mashable that will appear on DreamWorksTV for its Monday launch and in the coming days, including Shrek dispensing dubious oral hygiene advice (above).

Besides vlog posts from its stable of time-tested ‘toons, DreamWorksTV is also featuring original live-action shorts, including family-friendly reality shows Prank My Parents and Record Setter Kids; original animated web series like Jimmy Blue Shorts and Report Card.

If there was any doubt that AwesomenessTV is a huge part of this new effort, look no further than its founder, Brian Robbins, who is overseeing it for DreamWorks Animation.

“We’re tapping into the invaluable knowledge that Brian has amassed from his success with AwesomenessTV to create a unique, short-form, laugh-out-loud mobile experience for families,” DWA’s CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg said. “This is a huge opportunity for the DreamWorks brand.”

Additional series include kid-comedian sketch comedy show OMG; ensemble comedy Public Pool, which is actually about the goings-on at a public pool; Fifi: Cat Therapist, about a house cat who dispenses advice to neighborhood animals; best-of-web-shorts curation Watch This; and RetroToons, highlights from DreamWorks Animation’s classic media library.

Look for more original series on DreamWorksTV as summer rolls on, including Richie Rich, an original scripted series based on the comic book character.

Original post here.

CGI Far From Monkey-Business in Dawn of the Planet of The Apes

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

The latest installment of the Planet of the Apes franchise displays some of the most innovative CGI techniques to date. Weta Digital, the CGI mastermind behind such films as Ironman, Man of Steel and Avatar, has further evolved the digital animation process to achieve lifelike effects. Actors work side by side with the digital art and animation teams to achieve realistic facial expressions bringing the computer generated images to life.

In his article, “Is This the Most Remarkable CGI in a Film Ever?” Patrick Jong Tayor comments on the sequel’s amazing attention to detail. “To make it work, Weta Digital employed dozens of wireless 3D cameras to faithfully capture the actors playing the apes, who donned motion capture suits with active marker strands, measuring position, velocity and acceleration even if the markers were obscured from camera view, and witness cameras mounted to the suits to capture facial mocap information.”

Cogswell offers programs in Digital Art and Animation designed to prepare students for exciting careers throughout the entertainment, media and art industries. As seen with Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, CGI techniques need to be ever-evolving in order to compete with the next big blockbuster.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes has an interesting plotline, astounding CGI effects, and a smooth transition in the fictional 10-year time gap between films. Do you plan on seeing this summer blockbuster? Are you Team Human or Team Ape? Tell us in the comment section below.

Source: RedShark News

CGI Brings Fast and The Furious Back to Life

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

This past November actor Paul Walker and star of the popular “Fast & Furious” franchise passed away in a tragic car accident. His death came as a shock to his friends, family, and costars alike.
Walker’s death also put producers Vin Diesel and Neil H. Moritz in a bind of figuring out how to have Walker’s star character, Brian O’Conner, exit the franchise in the upcoming Fast and the Furious 7. Production was well underway for the film’s seventh installments, posing the question, how can this be done? CGI technology allows digital animation artists to bring Walker back to life.

The New York Daily News reports that, “They have hired four actors with bodies very similar to Paul’s physique and they will be used for movement and as a base,” one source close to production tells us. “Paul’s face and voice will be used on top using CGI”.

This CGI call has sparked controversy amongst fans and critics, half arguing that this could be creepy and distasteful, while the other half agree it’s the only way possible to witness Walker’s final performance.

In the past, films in similar situations rarely achieve box office success with attempts to reshoot, recast or simply omit characters that have untimely passed midway through production. However, with the highly successful Fast & Furious franchise (the latest installment Fast & Furious 6 bringing in a whopping $789 million) the pressure is on to successfully transition Walker’s character out in a strategic and respectful manner.

Do you think using CGI is distasteful or creepy for bringing the deceased back to life? Or do you think it’s a just technological solution to reprise his final role? Are you planning on seeing Fast & Furious 7? Tell us in the comments below!

Quote and Image Source:

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/confidential/fast-furious-7-double-time-walker-article-1.1728704

Godzilla vs. Smaug: Who Wins This Dragon Duel?

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

Godzilla has fought many a monster — from giant moths to massive robots to smog incarnate to even King Kong — and he’s lived to roar about it.

But what would happen if the King of the Monsters faced down the dragon Smaug from J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic “The Hobbit”?  With a new “Godzilla” stomping to theaters next week, and “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” recently out on home video and “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” on the way in December, we thought it would be fun to pit these two behemoths — one a Japanese kaiju, or “strange creature,” and an avatar of the Nuclear Age; the other a fire-drake from the North in Tolkien’s mythical Middle-earth — against each other.

To break down the matchup, Speakeasy enlisted two experts: In Godzilla’s corner, we have Chris Picard, owner and editor of the Godzilla-movies.com fansite, citing contributions from staffer Gregory Hudgens. Representing Smaug’s side is “Demosthenes,” the news editor of TheOneRing.net, a popular fansite dedicated to the works of J.R.R. Tolkien’s works and the films based on them.

To see the argument category by category, visit the full article here.

The Sims 4: Unique Fusion of A.I. Technology and Emotion-Based Soundtrack offers Gamers New Ways to interact with their Sims

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Since 2000 The Sims has been a staple in the gaming world, setting the standard for real-life simulation.  However in recent years the various expansion packs and add-ons have confused consumers on the brand that original creator Will Wright began 14 years ago.

The Sims 4 offers new and exciting features that will remind gamers of the original game rooted in emotion. “SmartSim”, is a new feature that heightens emotions for the Sims. During gameplay, the Sims’ emotions are impacted in different ways, for example, hobbies, relationships, food, etc. Combined with new digital animation techniques and A.I. technology, the “Smart Sim” is a completely new breed of Sim.

In the past Sims never interacted with the gamer. However, by adding emotion, and a new soundtrack, the Sim can now react with the gamer through music. Soundtrack composer Ilan Eshkeri had to create scores that could take advantage of the SmartSim’s emotional capabilities and also hark back to earlier stages in the game.

“If something emotional happens… I’d try to relate all of those to a few notes or a riff or a chord sequence that appeared in one of the longer pieces of background music. For example, if character is doing something in the house or if something breaks in the house, I’d try to relate that to the music you heard when you were building the house,” Eshkeri said.

According to executive producer Rachel Franklin, the flow of the game comes together with the marriage of sound design and digital animation technology. “Ilan is known for these theatrical sweeping, wonderful compositions,” Franklin said. “It’s a way for the Sim to respond back to the player… You can really feel that in the audio. Combining that with animation technology and facial emotional overlays… things work together in a really cool way to make you feel more related to your Sim. Because ultimately you’re caring for them…the music brings your relationship really to a height.”

Cogswell College offers programs in Digital Art and Animation, Digital Audio Technology, and Game Design.  Titles like The Sims 4 wouldn’t be possible without the technological advancement of these disciplines.  – Learn more about the opportunities these programs can provide TODAY!

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/may/07/sims-4-composer-ilan-eshkeri

Low-Budget Projects Offer Promising ROI Thanks to Digital Technology Advances and Creative Marketing Strategy

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

Low budget film and animation productions utilize every means possible to get the job done, all the while watching every penny.  Filmmakers often tell stories of their earlier work, from casting parents and friends, to shooting in their neighbor’s backyard.

However, within the last ten years we’ve seen a jump in the quality of low budget projects as well as higher profits. The 2009 box office hit Paranormal Activity was filmed on a budget of only $450K and brought in over $89 million in profits. That’s a 19,849% return on investment!  This is all thanks in part to smart viral marketing campaigns, as well as creative editing via digital technology.

Independent filmmakers and animators are able to create projects more cost effectively compared to the big name studios. Since their projects are low budget, an independent project can afford to fail, compared to a major motion picture company flop that could cost millions.

In the case of Paranormal Activity, we saw a highly creative viral marketing campaign based on sounds and reactions that fed off human curiosity. Online trailers showed clips of the audience’s reactions of sheer terror, paired with strategic sound design. Digital Audio was key in adding to the fear factor to the preview. This drove traffic into the theaters and proved to be another contributing factor to the project’s success.

Cogswell College offers programs in Digital Art and Animation designed to prepare students for careers throughout the entertainment industries. Cogswell also offers programs in Digital Audio Technology, which provides project-based instruction for a wide range of professional audio fields by developing skills in sound design for film and other areas. Both areas are key for independent low-budget projects to become box office hits.

What Can You Do with a Degree in Digital Art and Animation?

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Without a doubt, California is the hotbed for digital art and animation degree programs. The state is home to many companies in the industry, including movie studios, CGI companies, and software & game developers. Cogswell College, located in Silicon Valley, CA, offers a Bachelor’s Degree in Digital Art and Animation (DAA). This program is designed with the goal to ensure that students leave Cogswell with the creative and technical skills required for multiple opportunities within the areas of the entertainment industry.

Many schools across the country offer degrees in fine arts or graphic design, and many of those graduates find themselves looking for a job in interactive; but they are sometimes behind the curve when they enter the job market. Although these are important aspects for multimedia design education, degrees specific to animation are preferred by most companies in the industry.

With a wide variety of jobs available in this growing industry, a career in digital animation can not only be appealing to creative individuals, but lucrative and highly competitive as well. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary for digital animators is more than $58,000. This job segment is expected to grow at 8% in the U.S. over the next decade.

Job positions in game development, television and movies are the most highly sought after career paths for people with a degree in digital arts. While this area has the largest number of jobs available for people with a DAA degree, the competition for positions in these areas are extremely high. However, other job possibilities exist on the cusp of the entertainment industry.

Working for an Advertising Agency:

Advertising agencies have an ongoing need for multimedia designers and the industry provides a steady and stable work environment for employees with experience. They work across a variety of areas, including commercials, websites, social media and video production. With companies large and small turning to the Internet to advertise their products and services, this area can potentially outgrow other positions which have traditionally been more sought after.

Many companies are using video channels (think YouTube and Vimeo) to advertise to their potential and existing customers. They are also using the video medium to provide product information and demonstrations. With this available to advertisers, it is important that there are multimedia designers available to generate the ideas, who have the technical expertise to make it happen.

The career path for a digital animator working in advertising is somewhat varied. While an employee may begin as a storyboard artist, they find themselves advancing through the agency quickly. Becoming a creative director is not uncommon; as the medium grows and rises in prominence it will happen with greater frequency, especially as employees with digital animation experience learn and become integral parts of other business areas.

Working for Bigger Companies:

Many companies, especially larger ones, choose not to employ advertising agencies and have been bringing their marketing in-house. This trend means that there will be a growing number of opportunities available in companies that many may not consider. Working for a large corporate entity has its advantages. The work is steady and the traditional benefits associated with them (insurance, retirement, etc.) may not be available when working for a small production company. Education, software and manufacturing are all areas with potential to see increased growth.

For more information about Cogswell’s Digital Art & Animation Bachelor Degree program, visit http://www.cogswell.edu/programs/digital-art-and-animation.php

Digital Art is Real Art – Really!

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

There’s an old adage that most people can’t define art, but they know it when they see it. The definition of art was debated long before the digital age. From Greek philosophers to the United States Supreme Court, wise people have tried to define what art is, the process by which it is created, and its meaning to society.

Defined in simple terms by Merriam-Webster, art is “the conscious use of skill and creative imagination especially in the production of aesthetic objects.”

As the process of creating digital art evolves and becomes more commonplace, we see debates in internet forums and hear conversations in museums and coffee shops about whether art created digitally can really be considered art.

Open for interpretation

Many would argue that art cannot be defined. In fact, the legal system has declined to “define” art and has instead left it open to interpretation. It allows for societal norms and does not put limitations on the evolving process by which it is created.

For the most part, fine art has been defined as something created primarily for beauty rather than utility and placed into categories such as painting, sculpture, poetry and music.

What is digital art?

Digital art is any form that utilizes digital technology during production. Fairly broad in definition, we know, but there are as many forms of digital art as traditional art. For the most part, though, a digital artist sits in front of a computer monitor to create, rather than a blank canvas or hunk of unformed clay.

Sometimes the image created is done from scratch; other times the artist is manipulating an existing image into something different and unique. Like other forms, digital art can take on many forms, from illustration to multimedia to interactive.

Commonalities exist between digital and traditional art. As in traditional art, there are very few successful, self-taught artists. The best digital artists study traditional techniques in order to become better artists. There is skill involved. Like a painter, a digital artist has tools available to help him create. But those tools do not create; the artist does! And like a painter, the digital artist must be well-versed in light, color, texture, saturation, and depth. Perhaps most importantly, each artist has to possess a desire to create and express through the medium.

Does digital art meet the definition of art?

Of course it does. At its base, art is merely a form of communication. The artist, through creativity, is attempting to express an idea or evoke an emotion. The same is most certainly true for a digital artist.

Like any other form of art, digital is merely the newest evolution of art. The potential of digital will grow as technology progresses and will be limited only by the artist’s imagination.

Cogswell College’s Bachelor Degree in Digital Art & Animation is designed to prepare students for exciting careers throughout the entertainment, media and art industries. Through extensive coursework, students gain hands-on experience using the latest tools and applications for 3D graphics and animation.

10 Most Influential Games of the 80s

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

It’s no secret that video games were a great deal different back in the 1980’s; from classics we still see today to the games that didn’t live to see the next decade. Remember the original versions of SimCity (1989), The Legend of Zelda (1987), John Madden Football (1988), and Super Mario Bros. (1985)? What about the always classic Pac-Man (1980) and Tetris (1987)? One component we can all likely agree on, however, is the fact that the ghosts of gaming past have paved the way and made a huge impact on the gaming industry we see today. This Yahoo article gives their picks of the 10 most influential games of the 1980s, but we’ll let you be the judge on which games were the most impactful from that decade.

What would you add to their list? How would you rank the games? Give us your two cents below!