Archive for the ‘Concept Art’ Category

Cogswell Faculty Shares His Expertise with DreamWorks Artists

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Even professional artists who are at the top of their game still have things to learn. Cogswell faculty, Thomas Applegate, brings inspiration and a new perspective to the artists who take his workshops through the Artistic Development Office.

Applegate designs the workshop content to meet DreamWorks goals which typically focus on expressive narrative and character design and expression. Most of his workshops run for 6 weeks and average 15 to 25 participants.

Some of the classes he has taught include: Character Development, Character Sculpture and 2D Water color Character Portrait. His most recent class was Character Expressions.

“When you teach a class to professional artists,” said Applegate, “the expectations are really high. It requires a lot of energy on my part to make sure I challenge them. But on the other hand, these very talented artists come in with lots of humility and are eager to learn. I feel honored that they approach our time together with that attitude and do my best to reciprocate.”

Thomas is an Assistant Professor in the Digital Art and Animation program at Cogswell and is the Director of the Studio E project class.

The Art of Teamwork

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

Collaboration is a work you hear all the time. It’s become a buzz word but its meaning has become diluted through constant use.

Here at Cogswell College we don’t just say it, we do it. In our Digital Art & Animation degree program students develop the fundamentals of design, form and stretching their imaginations but they also focus on building their team work skills. Our project-based learning environment helps them understand what it means to work with other for a common goal.

In this short video, student Katie Fortune, describes her experience not only developing her talent but what it’s like to work on a project with other students.

“They will ask me about my artistic opinion sometimes and I’m really honored when they do because there are some really artistic, creative people on my team.”

Popular Disney Characters Head Off to College

Monday, January 6th, 2014

Spanish artist, Hyung86, put together 18 sketches of what Disney characters might look like if they had gone to college and shared them on Smosh. Through their dress and mannerisms he also assigned them character traits as he envisioned how they might have behaved as college students.

Do you have a favorite? We’d love to see your sketches of what these characters might look like if they attended Cogswell College. Feel free to post them here.

Things You Should Not Say to Creative Types

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

If you’ve ever designed something for someone else, lots of these statements in BuzzFeed will sound familiar.  This humorous collection of cards was conceptualized and spearheaded by Mark Shanley and Paddy Treacy, an advertising creative team in Ireland.

The posters were created by several Irish design professionals, including graphic designers, other ad creatives, illustrators, animators, and directors, to name a few.

Do you have any favorites?

Giving Up Won’t Solve Your Problems or Why Art Can Be a Problem

Friday, November 29th, 2013

Disney Character Artist, Chris Oatley, shares insights into learning from your failures, knowing when you’ve learned everything you can from the piece of art you are working on and knowing when to move on. Oatley says, “Works of art abandoned for frustration, self-doubt and depression are needless casualties of a needless war.”

According to Oatley, the process of art-making is basically just a sequence of problems with corresponding solutions that begins with an idea or an inspiration and ends with a finished piece of art. Instead, he suggests that artists look at the rocky patches they hit during the creative process as a measure of progress.

His final piece of advice is, “Art problems are external. Don’t internalize them. Don’t blame yourself for their existence.”

What ‘rocky patches’ have you hit during the creative process and how did your solve them?

Storyboard Secrets from Disney Artist, Sherm Cohen

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

National Gallery Ident Project

In this detailed video tutorial, Disney Artist, Sherm Cohen, shares seven hidden patterns of successful storyboards. Sherm Cohen is a cartoonist, writer and storyboard artist. He got his start in animation at Nickelodeon on The Ren and Stimpy Show as a character layout artist, followed by a three-year stint on Hey Arnold as storyboard artist and director. In early 1998, Sherm Cohen was invited by SpongeBob’s creator Steve Hillenburg to be part of the original SpongeBob SquarePants crew as a writer, storyboard artist and director.

Cohen uses lots of examples to illustrate the ‘language of films’ and how to make the best shot choices by following patterns.

What tip will be most helpful to you?

Michael Mattesi Offering FORCE Drawing Workshop

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Cogswell College will host artist, author and animation industry resource in one of his FORCE Drawing Workshops. The event is only open to Cogswell students and limited to 50 participants. Sign up in The Pulse now because spaces are filling up fast.

Date:  Saturday, November 9

Time:  2:00 – 6:00PM

Place: Dragon’s Den

The workshop centers on Mattesi’s new approach to drawing based on the FORCES found in the figure and how they coincide with gravity. Any artist could use this concept of drawing but the animation industry has most used the technique due to its many parallel concepts in animating.

Mattesi has contributed his skills as a professional production artist on many award-winning projects. A brief client list includes Pixar, Walt Disney Feature Animation, Walt Disney Consumer Products, Marvel Comics, Hasbro Toys, ABC, Microsoft, Electronic Arts, DreamWorks/PDI, The School of Visual Arts, Peking University, Art Center, Nickelodeon and LeapFrog.

A Short History of Animation Techniques with Demo Clips

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

Paper Cut Out Animation

If you’ve ever wondered how animated films are made, the National Film Board of Canada took a neat look at a few of the many techniques that animators use to create their special brand of art. While some of the techniques are more widely utilized than others, the variety definitely gives artists the chance to share their message in a way that expresses their individuality.

Some of the techniques covered in the article include:

  • Animated drawing
  • Paper cut outs
  • Drawing & etching on film
  • Pinscreen
  • Computer

Do you have a favorite technique?

Pinscreen Animation Technique

Animated Drawing Technique

What’s your color IQ?

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Can you pick out the perfect hue or saturation for the sample colors? How good are you at identifying complimentary or triadic colors?

Take this simple test at color.method to find out.

Share it if you had fun!

Puzzle Game Project Class Gets Underway

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

In a recent Skype call on a large monitor at the front of the classroom, George Gagnon, Founder of Prairie Rainbow Company, met with students and faculty for an introductory session to clarify parameters for the project and to present the concepts the two student teams developed in a 48 hour turnaround.

The eleven students enrolled in the class were divided into two teams and tasked with creating a video game version of the Rainbow Squares table top game. Rainbow Squares is a puzzle game designed for elementary, secondary or adult learners to use as an individual or group learning tool. The game consists of six squares, each made up of three different rainbow-colored pieces. Each of these pieces can be used to form other squares using two, four, five or six pieces or can be used to learn addition and fractions.

“Rainbow Math Models are designed to engage students and let them learn through the method that is best for them,” said George. “Feelings learners get to build a physical model, image learners can create a visual model, while language learners have the chance to hear, read, or write a number model,” added George.  “I think by offering Rainbow Squares as a virtual learning tool, more students will have access to the learning method that works for them.”

After students introduced themselves, a representative from each team outlined the concepts they were considering for the game design.

The Red Team started with general ideas and then branched out. They thought it was important for the video game to represent the physical game since the product has been so successful. The team’s goal is to make students want to play the game over and over. They also discussed implementing different levels for different shapes such as one level to focus on manipulating squares, another for pentagons and another for triangles. Other ideas involved creating a limited moves mode or an addition mode with each block being assigned a numerical value. The team would also like to explore a multiplayer option.

The Blue Team first wanted to know if George would prefer a more structural approach to presenting the concepts of addition and fractions or would he consider a more spatial representation of the math concepts through graphs or perhaps as weights on a scale. Would he like the final game to be more session-based play or individual play? If he would like a more structural approach to teaching the concepts, then they are thinking about a more traditional approach with something like Tetris.

“I love the creativity the teams have put into the process. I’m excited about what I’ve heard today and can’t wait to see the finished products,” said George.