Video Gaming and Healthcare Industries Collaborate to Deliver Dual-Effect Treatment

July 17th, 2014

Do you suffer from anxiety, depression, foggy memory, or lack of focus? Your doctor may soon prescribe video games as a form of mental therapy.  In his recent article “Will Doctors Soon Prescribe Videogames?” Adam Bluestein reveals that brain-training games are quickly being welcomed as a means of therapy by both the neuroscience as well as pharmaceutical companies. The game featured in the attached video is called Neuroracer, “a specifically designed driving game… [for] age-related cognitive decline in senior citizens, improving memory, attention, and the ability to multitask.” says Bluestein.

However gaming-based health solutions aren’t limited to the senior market. Another Neuroracer platform game called EVO is being developed, by game maker Alkili Interactive Labs, for adolescent to middle age adult tablet users. “The game is currently being deployed in about a half dozen clinical trials, testing its effectiveness for improving function in kids with ADHD (in collaboration with Shire) and autism, treating depression (with the National Institutes of Health), and detecting early signs of Alzheimer’s disease (with Pfizer).” Says Bluestein.

Pharmaceutical companies are partnering with game developers to market drug-software “eFormulations”. “Imagine picking up your medication and finding a software code on the package that directs you to a complementary game,” Bluestein said. This will be particularly helpful in aiding general anxiety disorder. Benzodiazepine is the standard prescription, which usually requires a component of deep breathing and meditation. The games are designed to put the patient at ease and in a state of serenity needed to react with the medication.

Cogswell offers programs in Game Design and Development combining both engineering and art for games and various forms of interactive technology.  The possibilities of merging game design with the healthcare industry open up lots of potential directions for future designers.

Where do you see the partnership between the two industries leading? What other industries do you think may merge with game design in the future? Let us know in the comments!

Source: Fast Company

Cogswell Student’s Artwork Featured On Kotaku!

July 16th, 2014
Matt Bard

Dungeonesque Walls

One of our students, Matt “Bardler” Bard, had his polycount rock formation featured on Kotaku as, “A rather magnificent-looking, somewhat dungeonesque wall from Bardler”

Clicker here for the article!

Awesome job, Matt!

DreamWorksTV Hits YouTube With Shrek the Ogre ‘Vlogger’

July 16th, 2014

DreamWorks Animation has launched its YouTube arm, DreamWorksTV, with a slew of “vloggers” that you’ve come to know on the big screen (including Shrek, Puss in Boots and Kung Fu Panda) — and quite a few original newcomers, too.

As of Monday morning, DWA is officially cashing in on the No. 1 reason it bought Awesomeness TV for $33 million plus incentives last year: so it could leverage its popular animated characters online and help launch a bunch of new ones.

DreamWorksTV “combines DreamWorks Animation’s expertise as a global family entertainment brand with the digital savvy of AwesomenessTV,” the company said in a statement. DWA also shared several video clips exclusively with Mashable that will appear on DreamWorksTV for its Monday launch and in the coming days, including Shrek dispensing dubious oral hygiene advice (above).

Besides vlog posts from its stable of time-tested ‘toons, DreamWorksTV is also featuring original live-action shorts, including family-friendly reality shows Prank My Parents and Record Setter Kids; original animated web series like Jimmy Blue Shorts and Report Card.

If there was any doubt that AwesomenessTV is a huge part of this new effort, look no further than its founder, Brian Robbins, who is overseeing it for DreamWorks Animation.

“We’re tapping into the invaluable knowledge that Brian has amassed from his success with AwesomenessTV to create a unique, short-form, laugh-out-loud mobile experience for families,” DWA’s CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg said. “This is a huge opportunity for the DreamWorks brand.”

Additional series include kid-comedian sketch comedy show OMG; ensemble comedy Public Pool, which is actually about the goings-on at a public pool; Fifi: Cat Therapist, about a house cat who dispenses advice to neighborhood animals; best-of-web-shorts curation Watch This; and RetroToons, highlights from DreamWorks Animation’s classic media library.

Look for more original series on DreamWorksTV as summer rolls on, including Richie Rich, an original scripted series based on the comic book character.

Original post here.

Game Developer Diversity Is Needed to Further Industry Boom

July 10th, 2014

An encouraging report by the International Game Developers Association recently found that women now make up 22% of the computer game workforce. This is a massive improvement from the previous figure of just 4% of the UK industry in 2009.

But it doesn’t go far enough. A serious sector ought to have a workforce that reflects wider society. Until it does, the industry will see its creativity diminish, its reputation suffer and eventually its bottom line will be hit.

Although the computer games industry is approximately 40 years old it has grown rapidly over the past decade or two. What was once largely small firms and individuals programming in their bedrooms is now a $15 billion market dominated by multinational corporations. And it’s still growing — one forecast says the industry will be worth $82 billion by 2017.

According to the Entertainment Software Association in 2013 women represented 48% of players and are equal purchasers of games. So given all this, why are women still underrepresented in the industry workforce?

See the full publication here.

Visit Cogswell’s Game Design & Development program page to learn more about how to start your education and career in the game development industry!

Cogswell College Launches ‘Immersion Experience’ Program

July 9th, 2014

SUNNYVALE, CA — Cogswell College (www.cogswell.edu), an institution that offers a unique curriculum fusing digital arts, engineering, and entrepreneurship, has launched a brand new program, “The Silicon Valley Immersion Experience” (www.entrepreneurship.cogswell.edu/immersion). Now available to entrepreneurs and students on a global scale, Cogswell’s Silicon Valley Immersion Experience program just hosted its first group of participants — a team of entrepreneurs from Turkey. The announcement was made by Dr. Deborah Snyder, president and chief academic officer, Cogswell College.

Spearheaded by John Duhring, Cogswell College’s education technology specialist, five entrepreneurs from the Turkey-based Sabanci University’s “SUCool” Pre-Incubator Program, very recently visited the Cogswell College campus. The group also attended a series of meetings, workshops, showcases, meetups and presentations, including trips to Stanford University, IDEO, and the Institute for the Future; such top Silicon Valley-based companies as Google, Skype, Flipboard, and Eventbrite; financiers and incubators including StartX, the Founder Institute, Hackers/Founders, and Hanhai Investments, and start-ups including Good Eggs, gThrive, NVT, Diya TV, and others.

Read more on Computer Graphics World.

CGI Far From Monkey-Business in Dawn of the Planet of The Apes

July 8th, 2014

The latest installment of the Planet of the Apes franchise displays some of the most innovative CGI techniques to date. Weta Digital, the CGI mastermind behind such films as Ironman, Man of Steel and Avatar, has further evolved the digital animation process to achieve lifelike effects. Actors work side by side with the digital art and animation teams to achieve realistic facial expressions bringing the computer generated images to life.

In his article, “Is This the Most Remarkable CGI in a Film Ever?” Patrick Jong Tayor comments on the sequel’s amazing attention to detail. “To make it work, Weta Digital employed dozens of wireless 3D cameras to faithfully capture the actors playing the apes, who donned motion capture suits with active marker strands, measuring position, velocity and acceleration even if the markers were obscured from camera view, and witness cameras mounted to the suits to capture facial mocap information.”

Cogswell offers programs in Digital Art and Animation designed to prepare students for exciting careers throughout the entertainment, media and art industries. As seen with Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, CGI techniques need to be ever-evolving in order to compete with the next big blockbuster.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes has an interesting plotline, astounding CGI effects, and a smooth transition in the fictional 10-year time gap between films. Do you plan on seeing this summer blockbuster? Are you Team Human or Team Ape? Tell us in the comment section below.

Source: RedShark News

“Transformers: Age of Extinction” Great for CGI – Bad for Bay…

July 3rd, 2014

Director Michael Bay is getting slammed with reviews on “Transformers: Age of Extinction”. The majority of which criticize his directing skills for an amateur in story line, a flopped plot-development, and an overabundance of product placement.

In his recent review, Boston Globe columnist Peter Kenough noted that it was “all shot and edited as if by a Cuisinart. In short, the cinematic equivalent of being tied in a bag and being beaten by pipes.”

This is the first installment of the Transformers franchise that we won’t be seeing resident protagonist Sam Witwicky, played by Shia LaBeouf. Instead we get the Hollywood star power of Mark Wahlberg, however his performance is also highly criticized. “Wahlberg spends a lot of time looking with awe and terror into the blankness of a green screen, later filled in post-production by Bay’s monumental, juvenile special effects’, critiques Kenough.

However “monumental” and “juvenile” the special effects are, one can’t help but step back in awe at the advancements in CGI animation and digital special effects. Shots of giant alien spacecrafts, a prehistoric dinosaur extermination, cityscape battlegrounds, giant robotic aerial dogfights, and rumors of a robotic Oreo cookie.

According to his review (embedded above) Mr. Sunday Movies says, “The special effects cannot be faulted… They should almost be called VERY-Special Effects.” Cogswell offers programs in Digital Art and Animation designed to prepare students for exciting careers throughout the entertainment, media and art industries. Special effects are key in producing summer blockbuster hits, especially those directed by explosion king Michael Bay.

Do you think Bay’s a CGI-Genious, or a bogus bomb of a director? Are you planning on seeing Transformers: Age of Extinction? Are you Team Optimus, or Team Bumblebee?

Source: The Boston Globe

This Software Will Let Anyone Create Virtual Reality Games

July 1st, 2014

While the frontiers of virtual reality are expanding due to increased interest in the Oculus Rift headset, creating games and virtual reality experiences has generally been limited to those who can program.

Sixense, a company known for its motion controllers that excel in virtual environments, wants to lower the barrier of entry to VR creation to anyone with a little design know-how with its upcoming software development kit. The SixenseVR SDK will integrate into Unity and Unreal Engine, two of the most popular game engines, giving creators a toolset that already supports most gaming platforms.

“The main reason this is important is because quite often developers such as designers and artist have great game concepts but are not proficient in programming and are often dependent on others to see their ideas come to life,” said Sixense Creative Director Danny Woodall. “Giving them the ability to prototype and flush out their ideas without the aid of someone else is very powerful. Unreal 4 has a similar vision and uses a system called blueprints to allow developers to use a node based visual scripting system.”

Read the full article here.

Developers – do you support this technology? Weigh in below!

E3 Fans Go Bananas at The Super Smash Bros. Invitational Tournament: The Olympics of Nintendo

June 26th, 2014

The most talked about title at the recent E3 convention, held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, was the upcoming and highly anticipated fourth installment of Super Smash Brothers. The hype was generated from its massive fan base for the first chance to see the game in action, as well as the first ever Super Smash Brothers for Wii U Invitational tournament.

E3 Fans dressed up as their favorite Smash Bros. characters and waited in an entry line that wrapped nearly the entire circumference around the Staples Center. Superfans included Pikachu, Ness, WaLuigi, and a very vocal Yoshi. Check out the line footage here:

Fans from around the world also got to partake in the event, as it was broadcast on Twitch, a live-streaming video platform focused on gaming. This truly was the Olympics of Nintendo. The Super Smash fans cheered for their favorite digitally animated heroes (Megaman appeared to be the crowd favorite) and held up signs as the countdown to show time commenced.

Geoff Keighley of Spike TV’s GTTV (Game Trailers TV) hosted the Invitational, promising fans a first look at the game as well as the tournament itself. 16 highly skilled players from around the world met to compete in the tournament. One by one players fell as commentators shouted over-excited observations during game play. The Invitational climaxed as Zero Suit Samus (played by professional gamer Gonzalo “CTZeRo” Barrios) defeated Kirby in the final match.

Super Smash Brothers for Wii U will be released in late winter of 2014. The title boasts running speeds of 60fps, which means players are going to get a graphically-smooth fighting experience. Another perk is the simplicity of controls, as it can be played with almost any of the previous game console controllers. This offers players the familiarity of past titles, with the updated design tech capabilities of the Wii U.

Cogswell offers programs in Game Design and Development combining both engineering and art for games and various forms of interactive technology.

Would you wait in line to watch an epic gaming tournament? Who is your favorite Smash Bros. character? Tell us in the comment section below!

The Lessons Learned After Spending 13 Years Making One Game

June 24th, 2014

What happens when you spend literally half your life working on one game? This burden was carried by one developer as he spent 13 years trying to develop “the game he had always wanted to make.”

Adam Butcher started working on his game Tobias and the Dark Sceptres when he was 14 years old. He was using Multimedia Fusion when he started, game creation software for those without coding experiences that became popular in the early 2000s.

Now that Tobias and the Dark Sceptres is complete, Butcher looks back on his years of toil in this charmingly animated YouTube video. He calls his labor “The Game That Time Forgot” because of how much gaming standards, especially the concept of indie games, had changed since he started as a teenager. He said he hoped the video is a cautionary tale to developers who let a project consume too much.

Butcher is free of his albatross now, and the game can be downloaded at no charge on its website.

See the full story here.

Interested in Game Design & Development? Read more about Cogswell’s Bachelor Degree Program!